Showing 12 results

Names
Buildings and structures

Agricultural Building (University of Saskatchewan)

  • UASC0003
  • Buildings and structures
  • 1988-present

Original plans for the Agriculture Building had it joining Kirk Hall, the John Mitchell Building and Crop Science, but the architects, Folstad-Friggstad, instructed to provide “a highly visible complex for the College,” proposed a stand-alone building intended to state the importance of the College of Agriculture to the University. It is the first major building on campus clad with glass rather than brick or stone.

The original structure cost $91,000,000 and was constructed between 1988-1991. It consisted of five floors, with 164 research labs, 38 teaching labs, 182 offices, 9 classrooms, 4 computer training facilities, 6 conference rooms, and 167 controlled environment plant growth facilities. In addition it has an impressive inner courtyard, the Atrium, and is home to the Kenderdine Gallery, named in honour of the University’s first art instructor.

Numerous private and corporate donors contributed to the building fund.

The structure had been designed to enable future expansion, and by 2000 a sixth floor was added at a construction cost of $10,000,000. The new addition was intended to house Animal and Poultry Science, Food Science, and Bioinsecticide Research.

Indian Head Methodist Church

  • IHM021
  • Buildings and structures
  • 1883-1925

The Indian Head Methodist Church held its first services on July 29, 1883 in the CPR Railway Station. On May 24, 1925, the congregation voted to unite with the Presbyterians into the United Church.

Saskatchewan Cancer an Medical Research Institute

  • UASC0001
  • Buildings and structures
  • 1958-2009

The Saskatchewan Cancer and Medical Research Institute was officially opened on 10 May 1958 by Premier T.C. Douglas. Clad in locally quarried greystone with limestone panels, it was the last of the buildings that constituted the University’s Medical Complex’s initial phase. Designed by Izumi, Arnott and Sugiyama and completed at a cost of $783,000, the building’s purpose was to provide shared accommodation for both general medical research and cancer specific investigations. Funding came from the federal and provincial governments and the provincial and national branches of the Canadian Cancer Society. A planned third floor was added in 1966. The building was "deconstructed" in 2009, with much of the building's material recycled including the greystone cladding for use with the E Wing that opened in 2013.

University of Saskatchewan - Arts Building√

  • Buildings and structures
  • 1958-pesent

As early as 1909 plans for an Arts Building were proposed for the University of Saskatchewan campus. In the early years of the University David Brown and Hugh Vallance, the original campus architects had in fact designed a building for the Humanities. The building was to have been named Haultain Hall after Sir Frederick Haultain, Premier of the North West Territories from 1891-1905 and Chancellor of the University of Saskatchewan from 1917-1940.

Finally in 1957 funding for the construction of an Arts building materialized. In that year the Canada Council provided a grant to the University of Saskatchewan for the construction of the Arts Building. The grant was part of a greater program designed to fund the construction of facilities for the Humanities at Universities across Canada. In May of 1957 University President Walter Thompson obtained an agreement from the Provincial Government to provide for one-half of the funds for the Arts Building as well as full funding toward the construction of an Animal Husbandry and a Biology Building.

University of Saskatchewan - Geology Building√

  • Buildings and structures
  • 1986-present

The construction of the Geology Building marked a return to the early style of campus architecture. The Department of Geology had been formed in 1927 and for the next six decades was based in the east wing of the Engineering Building. A growing faculty and student population had forced the department to cobble together makeshift accommodation in trailers and remote campus buildings. Designed by the architectural firm Black, McMillan and Larson of Regina, the building was given a neo-Collegiate Gothic exterior to blend harmoniously with the other buildings in the central campus. The two-and-a-half-storey building was erected just south or the bowl side of the W.P. Thompson Biology Building providing 8,543 square metres for office, laboratory, library, classroom, and storage space for rock and fossil samples. The exterior was clad with greystone and dressed with tyndal limestone. The dominant feature of the interior was a two story atrium that featured the mosaics for the former exterior walls of the Thompson Building, a life-size skeleton of a Tyrannosaurus Rex and geological and biological displays.

The $18.5 million Geology Building was completed in 1986 and fused the space between Physics and Biology and linked, through a walkway, with Chemistry, creating an integrated science complex on campus.