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Names

A.K.A. Gallery

  • Collectivité

In 1971 Shoestring founders Dorothy Boerma, Lorna Cutting, Ann Newdigate Mills, Jo Shepherd and Betty Warnock "to come to terms with the lack of local exhibition space, the lack of communication with their fellow artists and the public and the lack of sales opportunity" rented two rooms above the Sally Shop on Second Avenue in Saskatoon and started their own gallery. It was operated as a cooperative, with all decisions being made by the group itself. Incorporated as a non-profit society in 1973, the gallery subsisted on grants from the Saskatchewan Arts Board, Canada Council, Department of Culture and Youth, Saskatchewan Sport Trust, etc. as well as membership dues and commissions on artists' sales. It is interesting to note that the gallery did not hire any staff until 1978. By 1981 there were a number of successful commercial galleries in Saskatoon. This led to the original mandate losing its validity and perpetual financial problems. In 1982 the Canada Council provided ongoing financial support for the gallery to be operated as "an alternative artist-run centre". To better reflect this new direction, the name was changed to A.K.A. Gallery.

Walker, Frederic

  • Personne
  • 1933-2012

Frederic Walker was born at Poucecoupe, British Columbia on September 4, 1933. He was raised in Pincher Creek, Alberta. He received a degree in Education from the University of Alberta and a BA in History from the University of Saskatchewan. He taught at Grand Prairie, AB; Falher, AB; Fort McMurray, AB; Inuvik, NWT and Tuktoyaktuk, NWT. Walker also spent a year working in Paulatuk, Northwest Territories. Walker died at Royal University Hospital in Saskatoon on January 24, 2012.

46th Battalion (South Saskatchewan), C.E.F.√

  • SCAA-UASC-0001
  • Collectivité
  • November 7, 1914 - August 30, 1920

A memorial stone and plaque honouring the memory of those who served with the 46th Canadian Infantry Battalion (South Saskatchewan ), Canadian Expeditionary Force, 1914-1918, rests under a tree on the northeast corner of the Bowl. "Designed by a well known sculptor of Winnipeg", it was presented to the University at a solemn ceremony in Convocation Hall on November 11, 1933. The Great War exacted a heavy toll on the U of S. Of the 336 students, faculty and staff who enlisted, 67 "passed out of the sight of man by the path of duty and self-sacrifice". More than 100 more were wounded and 33 were awarded medals of valour. The School of Engineering closed its doors for the 1916-1917 session when the faculty and students enlisted en masse. Formed in February of 1915, the 46th Canadian Infantry Battalion (South Saskatchewan ) was to have a strength of 600 men. Its ranks were filled primarily with Saskatchewan youths, many via the University of Saskatchewan. Also known as the "Suicide Battalion", it fought in some of the bloodiest encounters of the war. Reinforcements were constantly needed as battle after battle decimated its ranks. Of the 5,374 men in the 46th Battalion, 4,917 were either killed or wounded. A particularly costly battle was Passchendaele, where there were 403 casualties from the battalion's strength of 600 men. With the end of the war came demobilization and the end of 46th Battalion. The soldiers became veterans and returned to civilian life. Many re-enrolled or entered the university for the first time. Many others did not return. Among those honoured on the plaque are Harold Blair and Reginald Batemen, two members of faculty killed in France.

Simpson, Graham Miller, 1931-

  • Personne

Graham Miller Simpson was born on December 21, 1931 in the New Zealand capital of Wellington. He earned a B.A.Sc. in Crop Science and M.A.Sc. in Plant Physiology and Biochemistry at Massey College, New Zealand before completing a Ph.D. in Plant Physiology from Wye College, University of London in 1959. He joined U of S Department of Crop Science in 1959 as a Post-Doctoral Fellow and rose through the ranks becoming a Full-Professor in 1970. Other appointments included Director of the Crop Development Centre, 1971-1974 and Director of the International Development Research Centre, Saskatoon Drought Project 1974-1982. Internationally known for his work on wild oats, the effects of drought conditions and seed dormancy in grasses, Simpson has a number of publications to his credit including the books Water Stress On Plants (1980) and Seed Dormancy in Grasses (1990). Dr. Simpson also maintains the Bibliography of Seed Dormancy which is a data base of 12,000 items covering material from the world literature on seed dormancy and germination from the 1890's to the present. In addition to serving on several departmental, college and university committees, Simpson was active in the University of Saskatchewan Faculty Association and an advocate of world peace and international development. He retired in 1999 and was named Professor Emeritus, Department of Plant Sciences, College of Agriculture.

Waiser, William Andrew

  • Personne
  • 1953-

William (Bill) Andrew Waiser was born in Toronto on 6 June 1953. He earned a B.A. Honours in History from Trent University in 1975 and went on to complete an M.A. (1976) and a Ph.D. (1983) in History at the University of Saskatchewan. Prior to joining the faculty of the U of S Department of History in 1983, Dr. Waiser was employed as a Lecturer in History at the U of S 1980-1983 and as Yukon historian, Parks Canada, Prairie and Northern Regional Office in 1983. In addition to teaching undergraduate and graduate students, he has served as graduate director (1987-1990) and department head (1995-98). A specialist in western and northern Canadian history, Waiser has authored, co-authored, or co-editor several books, including All Hell Can't Stop Us: The On to Ottawa Trek and Regina Riot, Park Prisoners: the Untold Story of Western Canada's National Parks, Loyal Till Death: Indians and the North-West Rebellion, Saskatchewan's Playground - A History of Prince Albert National Park, The Field Naturalist - John Macoun, the Geological Survey and Natural Science and Saskatchewan: A New History. Between 1998-2002, Waiser hosted "Looking Back," a weekly Saskatchewan History column on of CBC Saskatchewan television. Dr. Waiser has served on the council of the Canadian Historical Association (1997-2000), chaired the Advisory Board of the Canadian Historical Review (2000-2003), and has been a member of the Board of Directors of Canada's National History Society (2001-2004), publisher of The Beaver magazine. His many honours include the Queen's Fellowship (The Canada Council), Doctoral Fellowship (Social Sciences and Humanities and Research Council of Canada), the College of Arts and Science Teaching Excellence Award for the Humanities and Fine Arts and the University of Saskatchewan Distinguished Researcher. In 2006 Dr. Waiser was awarded the Saskatchewan Order of Merit.

Dewar, John Duncan, 1932-

  • Personne

John Duncan Dewar was born on 7 March 1932 in Sexsmith, Alberta. Graduating with a Bachelor of Education in Physical Education from the University of Alberta in 1955 he went on to earn a Master of Arts from the University of Ohio in 1960 and a Doctor of Education from the Florida State University in 1965. A former member of the University of Alberta Golden Bears basketball team, Dewar accepted the position of Athletic Director and Coach at the University of Saskatchewan for the 1960-61 academic year. He next moved to the University of Alberta, Calgary, where he was Assistant Professor of Physical Education, Men's Athletic Coordinator and Basketball Coach from 1961 until 1967. The next two years found him serving as Associate Professor and Director of Physical Education at St. Francis Xavier University, Antigonish, Nova Scotia. In 1969 Dr. Dewar joined the faculty of Laurentian University, Sudbury, Ontario. Over the next eight years he held a variety of academic and administrative positions, including: Full Professor and Dean of the Division of Physical Education, Associate Dean of Professional Schools, Acting Director of the School of Social Work, Head Administor of the School of Nursing and Acting Director of the School of Commerce. In 1977 Dewar returned to the University of Saskatchewan as Professor and Dean of the College of Physical Education. He remained Dean until 1986 and continued on faculty as Full Professor until his retirement in 1996, becoming Professor Emeritus. The bulk of Dr. Dewar's scholarly work relates to the study of sports history. Research and publications include works dealing with Dr. James Naismith, the Edmonton Grads, the Olympics, Indigenous athletes and athletics and residential schools. Dewar was member of several local, national and international societies and organizations and served on the editorial board or as a reader for several Saskatchewan sports history groups.

University of Saskatchewan. Vice-President Special Projects / Planning & Development

  • Collectivité

In 1981 Blaine Holmlund was appointed to a new administrative position: Vice-President (Special Projects). That office was responsible for initiating major projects; assisting Deans and faculty in implementing intercollege programs; preparing annual budget submissions and multi-year budget plans; campus-wide computer and communications services; the University Studies Group, physical plant operations, A-V services, college reviews, and student services. In his 10 December 1985 report to Council, President Leo Kristjanson noted that "because of a perceived uncertainty about the boundaries of responsibility indicated by the title VP Special Projects, the title has been changed to VP Planning and Development." The responsibilities of the office remained relatively unchanged. BA Holmlund continued as VP (Planning & Development) until his retirement from the University in 1991.

Holmlund, Blaine Adrian

  • Personne
  • 1930-2006

Blaine Adrian Holmlund was born at his family’s home (Section 11, Township 27, Range 7, West of the 3rd meridian),roughly 9 miles west of Strongfield, Saskatchewan, on 27 July 1930. His career began at age 12, as a hired farm labourer. He worked variously at the general store and as a mechanic at the local garage prior to joining the CPR as a relief station agent and telegraph operator (December 1948-May 1955). One of his supervisors at the CPR strongly urged Blaine to consider University – not an option considered before by Blaine or one expected by his family. Blaine entered engineering at the University of Saskatchewan and put himself through, earning his BE in 1955 and his MSc in 1961. Following his graduation in 1955, Blaine worked as a development engineer for Shell; for Atomic Energy of Canada at Chalk River; and as a communications engineer for Sask Power. He was briefly also a lecturer in electrical engineering at the University; and in 1958 returned, joining the faculty of the University of Saskatchewan where he remained for the rest of his career. From 1958-1992 he served the University in a variety of capacities: as a professor of electrical engineering; of biomedical engineering; of computational science; of finance and quantitative methods. He established, and served as first director of: the Biomedical Engineering Program; the Computational Science Department; the Hospital Systems Study Group; and the University Studies Group. He was named VP (Special Projects) in 1980 and VP (Planning and Development) in 1985. Blaine served as Acting University President in 1989. He served on the Board of the Saskatchewan Indian Federated College from 1982-1993, and from November 1990-June 1991 was on secondment from the University to serve as Acting President of the Saskatchewan Indian Federated College (now First Nations University of Canada). Blaine was awarded an honorary doctorate by the University of Saskatchewan in 1998. Following his retirement Blaine volunteered for Saskatoon Habitat for Humanity, helping to initiate partnerships with employment programs and to establish the Re-Store. He died in Saskatoon on 17 June 2006.

McConnell, William Howard, 1930-

  • Personne

Born in Aylmer, Quebec in 1930, William Howard McConnell received his early eduction locally before moving across the Ottawa River to attend Carleton University. He earned his first degree, a B.A. in Philosophy, in 1955. Subsequent degrees include a B.C.L. from the University of New Brunswick in 1958, a M.A. in Political Science at Ottawa University in 1962, a Ph.D. in Political Science from the University of Toronto in 1969 and a LL.M. in International Law from the University of Saskatchewan in 1970. Dr. McConnell was admitted to the New Brunswick Bar in 1958. From 1959-1963 he served as a Flight Lieutenant in the Judge Advocate General's Department, NDHQ, Ottawa, Royal Canadian Air Force. McConnell's first academic appointment came in 1966 when he joined the faculty of the Department of Political Science at Bishop's University, Lennoxville, Quebec. McConnell became a member of faculty in the University of Saskatchewan's College of Law in 1970, moving through the ranks to become a full Professor five years later. His academic speciality is constitutional law and federalism, in which he taught and was published widely. Dr. McConnell retired from the University of Saskatchewan in 1998.

Pawson, Ruth May, 1908-1994

  • Personne

Ruth May Pawson was born on 8 December 1908 in Stratford, Ontario. Moving west in 1912 her family settled in Regina which remained home until her death on 14 April 1994. Ruth attended the Regina Normal School in 1926-1927 beginning a teaching career that would last for the next four decades. In the 1930s and 40s Pawson took a series of art classes, receiving an Associate of Fine Arts Degree from Regina College (1940). She studied under Augustus Kenderdine at the Murray Point Summer School of Art at Emma Lake (1941, 1942 and 1946) and A.Y. Jackson at the Banff School of Fine Arts (1944, 1945 and 1947). Working primarily in oil and directly from nature, Pawson's favourite subject was the prairie landscape. From the 1940s to 1990s Pawson exhibited her work in a series of group and individual exhibitions. The naming of the Ruth Pawson School in Regina and receiving the Saskatchewan Order of Merit were among the many honours accorded her during her lifetime.

Kenderdine, Adelaide

  • Personne

Daughter of A.F. Kenderdine who married John Kenderdine, a distant relative.

Williamson, Robert Gordon, 1933-

  • Personne

Robert Gordon Williamson was born on 2 November 1931 at Oxley, Staffordshire, England. He immigrated to Canada in 1952 and was employed at a series of jobs; but while wintering at Ft. Simpson, Northwest Territories, he began recording Dené folklore as an independent initiative. This work was later published in Anthropologica, and Williamson's extensive record of scholarship in cultural anthropology and ethnology can be dated from this period forward. Between July 1953 and October 1954 while based at Pangnirtung, Baffin Island, he learned Inuktitut and extended his ethnological experience by travelling throughout Cumberland Sound. In 1954 Williamson began studying at Carleton University, earning a BA in anthropology in 1957; he earned a PhD from the Royal University, Uppsala, Sweden, in 1974. During the summers while working toward his first degree, Williamson was employed with the Department of Northern Affairs. In 1958 he joined the Department of Northern Affairs on a full-time basis, where he established their Eskimology section, founded the first Eskimo language journal, Inuktitut; and became Welfare and Rehabilitation Superintendent for the district of Keewatin, dealing primarily with social issues. He resigned in 1963, remaining in Rankin Inlet doing private research on a Canada Council grant. His career with the University of Saskatchewan began at the Centre for Community Studies, with a study of Fringe Saulteaux near Kamsack, Saskatchewan; by 1964 he had joined the department of Anthropology as a lecturer and was an associate director with the Institute for Northern Studies. He was quickly promoted: assistant professor in 1965; associate professor in 1967; full professor in 1973. In addition, Williamson served for over a decade as the director of the University's Arctic Research and Training Centre. In 1966 he was elected by acclamation in the first of his two terms as member for Keewatin to the Legislative Council of the NWT. Williamson has worked on behalf of numerous organizations, including the Inuit Tapirisat of Canada, the Canadian Eskimo Arts Council, the Inuit Circumpolar Conference, and the CBC Northern Service. He was invested into the Order of Canada in 1983. Upon his retirement from the University in 1999 Williamson was named Professor Emeritus, and at the fall 2000 convocation ceremony, was recognized with the JWG Ivany Internationalization Award.

Altschul, Rudolf

  • Personne
  • 1901-1963

Rudolf Altschul was born in Prague, Czechoslovakia, 24 February 1901. He graduated as a Doctor of Universal Medicine from the German University in Prague in 1925, and did postgraduate work in neurology and neuropathology in Paris and Rome. In 1939 he and his wife were forced to flee the Nazi occupation of Czechoslovakia, and were aboard the S.S. Athenia, the first ship torpedoed by the Germans in the Second World War. They eventually arrived in Canada, and Dr. Altschul accepted a position in the Department of Anatomy at the University of Saskatchewan. Prior to coming to Canada he had to his credit 32 scientific papers, and in the following years he contributed another 71 papers dealing with various subjects, including pathology of the nervous system, skeletal muscle degeneration, cell division and in particular, arterial degeneration. His most notable contribution was in demonstrating the cholesterol-lowering effect of nicotinic acid. Dr. Altschul died on 4 November 1963.

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