Showing 31 results

Names
Methodist Church√

Arnup, Jesse Henry

  • SCAA-UCCS-0089
  • Person
  • 1880–1965

Jesse H. Arnup, (1881-1965) was a Methodist and then United Church minister and later the Moderator of the United Church of Canada. He was born in Norfolk County, Ontario in 1881. In 1905, he was received on trial by the Methodist Church in Estevan, Saskatchewan. He graduated from Victoria College in 1909 and received his D.D. from Wesley College, Winnipeg, in 1924. From 1910 to 1912 he was Secretary of the Layman's Missionary Movement of the Methodist Church, Assistant Secretary of Overseas Missions from 1913 to 1925, and Secretary of United Church of Canada Foreign Missions from 1925 to 1952. He served as Moderator from 1944 to 1946.

Cooperating Committee of Saskatchewan

  • SCAA-UCCS-0075
  • Corporate body
  • 1911–1925

The Cooperating committee of Saskatchewan was formed when representatives of the Presbyterian and Methodist Churches met at Regina, May 2, 1911, in order to facilitate cooperative activity in various localities in Saskatchewan. The formation of this Committee paralleled a similar action taken at the national level by the Presbyterian, Methodist and Congregational Churches. After mid-1923, this committee was called the Provincial Committee on Co-operation.

General Council of Local Union Churches of Western Canada

  • SCAA-UCCS-0074
  • Corporate body
  • ca.1912–1925

In 1908, the Basis of Union was formulated that would eventually lead to the creation of the United Church of Canada in 1925. Coinciding with this spirit of unity, the first Union church (Presbyterian and Methodist) was set up in Melville, Saskatchewan in 1908, followed a short time later by the church in Frobisher. In 1912, a committee of Union Churches approached the national church courts of the Presbyterian, Methodist, and Congregational denominations in order to seek affiliation with the parent churches. This committee formed the nucleus of what would become the General Council of Union Churches of Western Canada. An Advisory Council, with representatives of the Union Churches and the parent churches, was established in 1914 as a means of creating the sought after link between the Union Churches and the parent churches.

Hafford Hospital

  • SCAA-UCCS-0160
  • Corporate body
  • ca.1922–1941

Hafford Hospital was first built around 1922, by the Missionary Society of the Methodist Church. The first superintendent was the Rev. G. Dorey, who would later become Moderator of the United Church of Canada (successor to the Methodist Church in Canada). Dr. S.M. Scott was the first doctor to serve the hospital, followed by Dr. Rose, who was later joined by Dr. Paulson. The Hafford Hospital Ladies Aid Society, formed 1924, was involved in raising money to support hospital activities. After financial difficulties in the 1930s, the hospital was eventually closed, in 1941, due to lack of funds.

In 1946, the R.M. of Redberry and the Village of Hafford bought the building and its equipment from the Missionary Society, then re-opened it as the Hafford Union Hospital.

Joint Committee on Church Union

  • SCAA-UCCS-0081
  • Corporate body
  • ca.1903–1925

The Joint Committee officially convened in April 1904, in Toronto, bringing together appointed representatives from the Congregationalist, Methodist and Presbyterian Churches, to negotiate church union. Meetings continued through to 1908, when the terms written in the Basis of Union were agreed upon and sent to the negotiating churches, for discussion and approval. By 1912, both the Congregationalists and the Methodists had agreed to the terms. The decision was more contentious for the Presbyterian Church, though in 1916, their General Assembly decided to go ahead with the union.
Between 1916 and 1925, the Joint Committee worked to complete the union and defeat those opposing it, including the newly formed Presbyterian Church Association.

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