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Arthur J. Porter - Portrait

Head and shoulders portrait of Arthur J. Porter, dean of Engineering.

Bio/Historical Note: Arthur J. Porter was born in 1910 in Ulverston, England. While studying at the University of Manchester, Porter helped build a differential analyzer - one of the world’s first analog computers, using a Mecanno construction set. In 1937 he accepted a fellowship at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). Porter helped build the Rockefeller differential analyser - the most ambitious analog/digital computer built to date. It was used extensively for projects during World War II. In 1949 Porter accepted a position with Ferranti Canada and worked on the DATAR system. DATAR combined data from a convoy of ships’ sensors, providing a single ‘overall view’ that allowed the commander to make better-informed decisions. Soon afterwards, in the early 1950s, Porter was one of six Canadians selected to work on Project Lamp Light; working on data processing expertise was crucial to this top-secret North American air defence initiative. In 1958 Porter became the fourth dean of Engineering at the University of Saskatchewan. There, along with Norman Moody and Dr. William Feindel, Porter established Canada’s first biomedical research program. In 1962 Porter moved to the University of Toronto to chair their new Industrial engineering department - one of the first in the world. While there, Porter also helped establish the University’s biomedical program. During the late 1960s he was involved in projects that bridged the gap between culture and science. He was the first acting director of the University of Toronto’s Centre for Culture and Technology. Porter also chaired the Science and Technology Advisory Committee when Montreal hosted the World’s Fair-Expo 67. Porter died in 2010 in Winston-Salem, North Carolina at age 99.

Carbon 14 - Research

Dr. Kenneth J. McCallum, professor and head, Department of Chemistry, stands beside equipment located at the Saskatchewan Research Council that is used for carbon 14 radioactive dating.

Bio/historical note: The Carbon 14 radioactive method of determining the ages of substances is carried out on the campus by the Saskatchewan Research Council, and is the only one in Canada. One of the experiments showed there were Indigenous peoples in British Columbia more than 8000 years ago. The method was applied by scientists outside Canada to confirm the age of the famous Dead Sea Scrolls (2000 years old).

CJUS-FM Radio Station - Interior

Note on back: "Dudley Newell, announcer librarian at CJUS-FM, operating in the control room of the University of Saskatchewan's student-run FM radio station".

Bio/Historical Note: In 1959 a campus group calling themselves "University Radio Productions" approached the federal government for a broadcast license to operate a student-run FM station on a non-commercial basis. Licensing requirements demanded that licenses only be issued to the university itself; in 1960 students approached the Board of Governors for approval. Operation of the station, including a constitution, was formalized in 1965 between the University and the Students Union (USSU), and CJUS-FM was launched. Studios were initially located in the basement of the university's Memorial Union Building, but were moved to the basement of the Education Building in 1980 next to the Department of Audio Visual Services. The station was launched through a partnership between the university's board of governors and its student union. For a number of years, the station also aired some programming from the CBC Stereo network before CBKS was launched. In 1983, with the station in financial trouble, it began to accept limited commercial advertising, and briefly changed its call sign to CHSK. The following year, the university's board decided to discontinue its funding of the station, and CHSK ceased broadcasting on 30 September 1985. CJUS was relaunched as an Internet radio stream in 2005.

CJUS-FM Radio Station - New Transmitter

Image of CJUS-FM Radio Station official opening of new transmitter. Standing (l to r): Al Pippin, CJUS-FM technical director; Gordon Walburn, station manager; Joanne Bristol, student volunteer; and Cliff Wright, mayor of Saskatoon. Tower in background; taken on top of Arts Building.

Bio/Historical Note: In 1959 a campus group calling themselves "University Radio Productions" approached the federal government for a broadcast license to operate a student-run FM station on a non-commercial basis. Licensing requirements demanded that licenses only be issued to the university itself; in 1960 students approached the Board of Governors for approval. Operation of the station, including a constitution, was formalized in 1965 between the University and the Students Union (USSU), and CJUS-FM was launched. Studios were initially located in the basement of the university's Memorial Union Building, but were moved to the basement of the Education Building in 1980 next to the Department of Audio Visual Services. The station was launched through a partnership between the university's board of governors and its student union. For a number of years, the station also aired some programming from the CBC Stereo network before CBKS was launched. In 1983, with the station in financial trouble, it began to accept limited commercial advertising, and briefly changed its call sign to CHSK. The following year, the university's board decided to discontinue its funding of the station, and CHSK ceased broadcasting on 30 September 1985. CJUS was relaunched as an Internet radio stream in 2005.

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