Showing 743 results

Archival description
Prince Albert (Sask.)
Print preview View:

690 results with digital objects Show results with digital objects

La Colle Falls - "operations on north shore"

View of operations on the north shore of the North Saskatchewan River at the La Colle Falls construction project. Two towers, various buildings and scaffolding

Bio/historical note: The Ruins at La Colle Falls - At the turn of the 20th century, the City of Prince Albert undertook an ambitious project to generate hydroelectric energy on the North Saskatchewan River by erecting a large turbine dam. Due to some logistical and engineering problems, the project was abandoned in 1914 only five years after construction first began. The city of Prince Albert nearly went bankrupt trying to pay off the $3 million white elephant. It would take half a century to pay off the debt. Today, all that remains of the massive construction project is a concrete labyrinth on the banks of the river east of Prince Albert. Travel to the site is not advised as the road is not maintained. Those choosing to proceed to the site do so at their own risk, as per the Virtual Prince Albert tourist website: http://www.virtualprincealbert.com/lacolle.htm (accessed March 10, 2010). These particular photographs were taken by an unidentified Engineer working on the project and donated by Prince Albert City Hall to the Prince Albert Historical Society

La Colle Falls - lowering a piece of equipment

View of a piece of machinery being lowered by a pulley system at La Colle Falls

Bio/historical note: The Ruins at La Colle Falls - At the turn of the 20th century, the City of Prince Albert undertook an ambitious project to generate hydroelectric energy on the North Saskatchewan River by erecting a large turbine dam. Due to some logistical and engineering problems, the project was abandoned in 1914 only five years after construction first began. The city of Prince Albert nearly went bankrupt trying to pay off the $3 million white elephant. It would take half a century to pay off the debt. Today, all that remains of the massive construction project is a concrete labyrinth on the banks of the river east of Prince Albert. Travel to the site is not advised as the road is not maintained. Those choosing to proceed to the site do so at their own risk, as per the Virtual Prince Albert tourist website: http://www.virtualprincealbert.com/lacolle.htm (accessed March 10, 2010). These particular photographs were taken by an unidentified Engineer working on the project and donated by Prince Albert City Hall to the Prince Albert Historical Society

La Colle Falls - construction

View of dam site construction including concrete, earth and wood protruding into river

Bio/historical note: The Ruins at La Colle Falls - At the turn of the 20th century, the City of Prince Albert undertook an ambitious project to generate hydroelectric energy on the North Saskatchewan River by erecting a large turbine dam. Due to some logistical and engineering problems, the project was abandoned in 1914 only five years after construction first began. The city of Prince Albert nearly went bankrupt trying to pay off the $3 million white elephant. It would take half a century to pay off the debt. Today, all that remains of the massive construction project is a concrete labyrinth on the banks of the river east of Prince Albert. Travel to the site is not advised as the road is not maintained. Those choosing to proceed to the site do so at their own risk, as per the Virtual Prince Albert tourist website: http://www.virtualprincealbert.com/lacolle.htm (accessed March 10, 2010). These particular photographs were taken by an unidentified Engineer working on the project and donated by Prince Albert City Hall to the Prince Albert Historical Society

La Colle Falls

View of line carrying load over dam site construction

Bio/historical note: The Ruins at La Colle Falls - At the turn of the 20th century, the City of Prince Albert undertook an ambitious project to generate hydroelectric energy on the North Saskatchewan River by erecting a large turbine dam. Due to some logistical and engineering problems, the project was abandoned in 1914 only five years after construction first began. The city of Prince Albert nearly went bankrupt trying to pay off the $3 million white elephant. It would take half a century to pay off the debt. Today, all that remains of the massive construction project is a concrete labyrinth on the banks of the river east of Prince Albert. Travel to the site is not advised as the road is not maintained. Those choosing to proceed to the site do so at their own risk, as per the Virtual Prince Albert tourist website: http://www.virtualprincealbert.com/lacolle.htm (accessed March 10, 2010). These particular photographs were taken by an unidentified Engineer working on the project and donated by Prince Albert City Hall to the Prince Albert Historical Society

La Colle Falls - "n. wall of lock"

View of North wall of lock construction

Bio/historical note: The Ruins at La Colle Falls - At the turn of the 20th century, the City of Prince Albert undertook an ambitious project to generate hydroelectric energy on the North Saskatchewan River by erecting a large turbine dam. Due to some logistical and engineering problems, the project was abandoned in 1914 only five years after construction first began. The city of Prince Albert nearly went bankrupt trying to pay off the $3 million white elephant. It would take half a century to pay off the debt. Today, all that remains of the massive construction project is a concrete labyrinth on the banks of the river east of Prince Albert. Travel to the site is not advised as the road is not maintained. Those choosing to proceed to the site do so at their own risk, as per the Virtual Prince Albert tourist website: http://www.virtualprincealbert.com/lacolle.htm (accessed March 10, 2010). These particular photographs were taken by an unidentified Engineer working on the project and donated by Prince Albert City Hall to the Prince Albert Historical Society

La Colle Falls - pulley tower

Tower for ropes and pulleys at the La Colle Falls construction site. Unidentified workmen

Bio/historical note: The Ruins at La Colle Falls - At the turn of the 20th century, the City of Prince Albert undertook an ambitious project to generate hydroelectric energy on the North Saskatchewan River by erecting a large turbine dam. Due to some logistical and engineering problems, the project was abandoned in 1914 only five years after construction first began. The city of Prince Albert nearly went bankrupt trying to pay off the $3 million white elephant. It would take half a century to pay off the debt. Today, all that remains of the massive construction project is a concrete labyrinth on the banks of the river east of Prince Albert. Travel to the site is not advised as the road is not maintained. Those choosing to proceed to the site do so at their own risk, as per the Virtual Prince Albert tourist website: http://www.virtualprincealbert.com/lacolle.htm (accessed March 10, 2010). These particular photographs were taken by an unidentified Engineer working on the project and donated by Prince Albert City Hall to the Prince Albert Historical Society

La Colle Falls - "tail race excavation"

View of tail race excavation at the La Colle Falls construction site

Bio/historical note: The Ruins at La Colle Falls - At the turn of the 20th century, the City of Prince Albert undertook an ambitious project to generate hydroelectric energy on the North Saskatchewan River by erecting a large turbine dam. Due to some logistical and engineering problems, the project was abandoned in 1914 only five years after construction first began. The city of Prince Albert nearly went bankrupt trying to pay off the $3 million white elephant. It would take half a century to pay off the debt. Today, all that remains of the massive construction project is a concrete labyrinth on the banks of the river east of Prince Albert. Travel to the site is not advised as the road is not maintained. Those choosing to proceed to the site do so at their own risk, as per the Virtual Prince Albert tourist website: http://www.virtualprincealbert.com/lacolle.htm (accessed March 10, 2010). These particular photographs were taken by an unidentified Engineer working on the project and donated by Prince Albert City Hall to the Prince Albert Historical Society

La Colle Falls - "tail race excavation"

View of tail race excavation at the La Colle Falls construction site

Bio/historical note: The Ruins at La Colle Falls - At the turn of the 20th century, the City of Prince Albert undertook an ambitious project to generate hydroelectric energy on the North Saskatchewan River by erecting a large turbine dam. Due to some logistical and engineering problems, the project was abandoned in 1914 only five years after construction first began. The city of Prince Albert nearly went bankrupt trying to pay off the $3 million white elephant. It would take half a century to pay off the debt. Today, all that remains of the massive construction project is a concrete labyrinth on the banks of the river east of Prince Albert. Travel to the site is not advised as the road is not maintained. Those choosing to proceed to the site do so at their own risk, as per the Virtual Prince Albert tourist website: http://www.virtualprincealbert.com/lacolle.htm (accessed March 10, 2010). These particular photographs were taken by an unidentified Engineer working on the project and donated by Prince Albert City Hall to the Prince Albert Historical Society

La Colle Falls - "blowing out coffer dam"

View dynamiting the coffer dam at the La Colle Falls construction project

Bio/historical note: The Ruins at La Colle Falls - At the turn of the 20th century, the City of Prince Albert undertook an ambitious project to generate hydroelectric energy on the North Saskatchewan River by erecting a large turbine dam. Due to some logistical and engineering problems, the project was abandoned in 1914 only five years after construction first began. The city of Prince Albert nearly went bankrupt trying to pay off the $3 million white elephant. It would take half a century to pay off the debt. Today, all that remains of the massive construction project is a concrete labyrinth on the banks of the river east of Prince Albert. Travel to the site is not advised as the road is not maintained. Those choosing to proceed to the site do so at their own risk, as per the Virtual Prince Albert tourist website: http://www.virtualprincealbert.com/lacolle.htm (accessed March 10, 2010). These particular photographs were taken by an unidentified Engineer working on the project and donated by Prince Albert City Hall to the Prince Albert Historical Society

La Colle Falls

View of the La Colle Falls construction project

Bio/historical note: The Ruins at La Colle Falls - At the turn of the 20th century, the City of Prince Albert undertook an ambitious project to generate hydroelectric energy on the North Saskatchewan River by erecting a large turbine dam. Due to some logistical and engineering problems, the project was abandoned in 1914 only five years after construction first began. The city of Prince Albert nearly went bankrupt trying to pay off the $3 million white elephant. It would take half a century to pay off the debt. Today, all that remains of the massive construction project is a concrete labyrinth on the banks of the river east of Prince Albert. Travel to the site is not advised as the road is not maintained. Those choosing to proceed to the site do so at their own risk, as per the Virtual Prince Albert tourist website: http://www.virtualprincealbert.com/lacolle.htm (accessed March 10, 2010). These particular photographs were taken by an unidentified Engineer working on the project and donated by Prince Albert City Hall to the Prince Albert Historical Society

La Colle Falls

View of the La Colle Falls construction project

Bio/historical note: The Ruins at La Colle Falls - At the turn of the 20th century, the City of Prince Albert undertook an ambitious project to generate hydroelectric energy on the North Saskatchewan River by erecting a large turbine dam. Due to some logistical and engineering problems, the project was abandoned in 1914 only five years after construction first began. The city of Prince Albert nearly went bankrupt trying to pay off the $3 million white elephant. It would take half a century to pay off the debt. Today, all that remains of the massive construction project is a concrete labyrinth on the banks of the river east of Prince Albert. Travel to the site is not advised as the road is not maintained. Those choosing to proceed to the site do so at their own risk, as per the Virtual Prince Albert tourist website: http://www.virtualprincealbert.com/lacolle.htm (accessed March 10, 2010). These particular photographs were taken by an unidentified Engineer working on the project and donated by Prince Albert City Hall to the Prince Albert Historical Society

La Colle Falls

View of the La Colle Falls construction project showing buildings in the river valley and unidentified workmen

Bio/historical note: The Ruins at La Colle Falls - At the turn of the 20th century, the City of Prince Albert undertook an ambitious project to generate hydroelectric energy on the North Saskatchewan River by erecting a large turbine dam. Due to some logistical and engineering problems, the project was abandoned in 1914 only five years after construction first began. The city of Prince Albert nearly went bankrupt trying to pay off the $3 million white elephant. It would take half a century to pay off the debt. Today, all that remains of the massive construction project is a concrete labyrinth on the banks of the river east of Prince Albert. Travel to the site is not advised as the road is not maintained. Those choosing to proceed to the site do so at their own risk, as per the Virtual Prince Albert tourist website: http://www.virtualprincealbert.com/lacolle.htm (accessed March 10, 2010). These particular photographs were taken by an unidentified Engineer working on the project and donated by Prince Albert City Hall to the Prince Albert Historical Society

La Colle Falls - workmen on river

View two unidentified workmen on the river with a dog at La Colle Falls

Bio/historical note: The Ruins at La Colle Falls - At the turn of the 20th century, the City of Prince Albert undertook an ambitious project to generate hydroelectric energy on the North Saskatchewan River by erecting a large turbine dam. Due to some logistical and engineering problems, the project was abandoned in 1914 only five years after construction first began. The city of Prince Albert nearly went bankrupt trying to pay off the $3 million white elephant. It would take half a century to pay off the debt. Today, all that remains of the massive construction project is a concrete labyrinth on the banks of the river east of Prince Albert. Travel to the site is not advised as the road is not maintained. Those choosing to proceed to the site do so at their own risk, as per the Virtual Prince Albert tourist website: http://www.virtualprincealbert.com/lacolle.htm (accessed March 10, 2010). These particular photographs were taken by an unidentified Engineer working on the project and donated by Prince Albert City Hall to the Prince Albert Historical Society

La Colle Falls - channel

View of a channel with lumber near the La Colle Falls construction project

Bio/historical note: The Ruins at La Colle Falls - At the turn of the 20th century, the City of Prince Albert undertook an ambitious project to generate hydroelectric energy on the North Saskatchewan River by erecting a large turbine dam. Due to some logistical and engineering problems, the project was abandoned in 1914 only five years after construction first began. The city of Prince Albert nearly went bankrupt trying to pay off the $3 million white elephant. It would take half a century to pay off the debt. Today, all that remains of the massive construction project is a concrete labyrinth on the banks of the river east of Prince Albert. Travel to the site is not advised as the road is not maintained. Those choosing to proceed to the site do so at their own risk, as per the Virtual Prince Albert tourist website: http://www.virtualprincealbert.com/lacolle.htm (accessed March 10, 2010). These particular photographs were taken by an unidentified Engineer working on the project and donated by Prince Albert City Hall to the Prince Albert Historical Society

Resultaten 1 tot 15 van 743