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E. Cora Hind

Image of E. Cora Hind, Editor, Winnipeg Free Press, checking grain in a field.

Bio/Historical Note: Ella Cora Hind, journalist, agricultural authority, activist and suffragist (1861-1942), was an acclaimed grain expert, a champion of women’s rights and an advocate for the franchise. Hind helped her grandfather on the family farm, where she learned about tending livestock, sowing wheat and judging when crops are ready to harvest. She was initially homeschooled but began attending classes at the age of 11 when a school was built nearby. During high school, Hind considered a career in teaching and wrote the exam. However, after failing the algebra section, she decided to become a journalist. Accompanied by her aunt, Ella Cora Hind boarded a train for Manitoba in 1882, travelling west for career opportunities. Armed with a letter of introduction from an uncle, Hind confidently entered the Manitoba Free Press office in Winnipeg. Editor William Fisher Luxton warmly welcomed her to the office but was astonished when she asked for a job as a reporter. Luxton refused. There were no women on staff, and he would not change policies. Hind left, feeling disappointed; however, she was not defeated. Hind heard about a brand-new office machine, the typewriter, and immediately rented one. She taught herself the two-finger hunt-and-peck method. After a month of intensive practice, she returned the machine and left with a job prospect. Shortly after, Hind secured a job working for a lawyer named Hugh John Macdonald (the son of Prime Minister Sir John A. Macdonald, who later became a politician and premier of Manitoba). Macdonald’s law office purchased the first typewriter in Winnipeg. Hind, the only typist west of the Great Lakes, was hired at a salary of six dollars a week. In 1893 Hind established Western Canada’s first public stenography bureau. At the same time, she was following developments in prairie farming. Among others, Hind’s clients included farmers, from cattlemen to grain farmers, and brokers. These men enjoyed working with Hind, who had an in-depth knowledge of farming due to her upbringing. Hind often submitted articles on agriculture to the newspaper under her preferred byline, E. Cora Hind. She soon became known as a grain expert. In 1901, editor John W. Dafoe of the Manitoba Free Press offered Hind a job as an agricultural editor. Tramping through fields to examine crops, she earned an international reputation as an agricultural journalist and “the oracle of wheat” for her accurate harvest yield predictions. She was also renowned for her non-traditional work wardrobe of riding breeches, high leather boots and a Stetson hat. Farm inspections later took Hind on travels throughout Canada and abroad. In 1924 alone, she travelled more than 10,000 kilometers to survey crops. Hind was a founding member of the Winnipeg branch of the Canadian Women’s Press Club. At the time, female journalists were not allowed to become members of the Canadian Press Club. Hind used her status to advocate for women in journalism and in the community.
Hind became involved in temperance movements shortly after arriving in Winnipeg in 1882. Her first job as typist for lawyer Hugh John Macdonald introduced her to a range of contacts and situations, including the desperate need for social reform. Unbearable living conditions, drunkenness, crime and child and spousal abuse were common in Winnipeg. Hind and her aunt joined the Women’s Christian Temperance Union (WCTU) in Winnipeg to press for prohibition. In 1894 she was a founding member of the Manitoba Equal Franchise Association with prominent suffragist Dr. Amelia Yeomans, who became the first president of the club. Hind composed and typed fiery suffrage speeches. In 1912 Hind co-founded the Political Equality League (PEL) with suffragist friends Nellie McClung and Lillian Beynon Thomas. Fighting for rights for all women, the core members of the PEL were professional women, such as journalists and physicians. Using education, speeches and satire, the PEL attracted public attention by holding a “mock parliament” in January 1914. Hind was part of the play’s cast, along with McClung and Thomas. The work of Hind and other suffragists ignited historic change. In 1916 Manitoba was the first province to grant women the right to vote and hold office. In 1935, the University of Manitoba awarded Hind an honourary Doctor of Laws degree. Seven years later, E. Cora Hind died at age 81. In 1997, a plaque was erected in Winnipeg, designating the journalist and suffragist as a National Historic Person.

Dr. Dwayne Brenna - Portrait

Head and shoulders publicity shot of Dwayne Brenna, Professor of Drama.

Bio/Historical Note: Dr. Dwayne Brenna was born 25 December 1955 in Spalding, Saskatchewan. He earned his BA (Hons, 1977) and his MA (1983), both from the University of Saskatchewan. Dr. Brenna earned his PhD (2000) from the University of London, England. He joined the Department of Drama in 1986. Dr. Brenna is currently Professor and Head of the Drama Department (2021). His poems and stories have appeared in various literary journals, and he is the author of several books, most recently New Albion (2016). Dr. Brenna has acted at the Stratford Festival and has appeared on television in various nationally and internationally broadcast programs, as well as movies. A series of character-based vignettes called The Adventures of Eddie Gustafson, written and performed by Dr. Brenna, had a five-year run on CBC Radio. Having completed his PhD at the University of London, Dr. Brenna regularly leads a study abroad course in London and Stratford-upon-Avon for students.

Dr. Dwayne Brenna - Portrait

Dwayne Brenna, Professor of Drama, stands in the hall of the John Mitchell Building.

Bio/Historical Note: Dr. Dwayne Brenna was born 25 December 1955 in Spalding, Saskatchewan. He earned his BA (Hons, 1977) and his MA (1983), both from the University of Saskatchewan. Dr. Brenna earned his PhD (2000) from the University of London, England. He joined the Department of Drama in 1986. Dr. Brenna is currently Professor and Head of the Drama Department (2021). His poems and stories have appeared in various literary journals, and he is the author of several books, most recently New Albion (2016). Dr. Brenna has acted at the Stratford Festival and has appeared on television in various nationally and internationally broadcast programs, as well as movies. A series of character-based vignettes called The Adventures of Eddie Gustafson, written and performed by Dr. Brenna, had a five-year run on CBC Radio. Having completed his PhD at the University of London, Dr. Brenna regularly leads a study abroad course in London and Stratford-upon-Avon for students.

Dwaine Nelson - Portrait

Head and shoulders image of Dwaine Nelson, Assistant Professor, Department of Music.

Bio/Historical Note: Dwaine Darold Nelson was born in 1926 at Coteau, Burke County, North Dakota and began playing in the family band as a pre-teen. Nelson attended Minot State Teacher's College, Minot, North Dakota, where he majored in music and specialized in teaching brass. After marriage in 1954 he moved to Mohall, North Dakota, where Nelson became the choral and instrumental music teacher at Mohall High and Middle School. Under his direction, the band took many state honors. He was active in the community where he also directed the choir at the Mohall Methodist Church. During the summers he studied for his MA at Greeley Colorado State University. He was often called upon to conduct symphonics bands at the International Music Camp near the International Peace Gardens. Nelson then accepted a position as chairman of the music department and professor of music at Dickinson Teachers College, Dickinson, North Dakota, in 1958. There he founded the Tri-State Music Festival. In 1967 Nelson moved to Saskatoon, where he was Professor of Music at the University of Saskatchewan. He won the Master Teacher Award in 1990 as Professor Emeritus for his excellence in and dedication to teaching. Nelson was a driving force in the development of the Department of Music forming instrumental programs which grew from near non-existence to hundreds of participants. In 1978 he founded UNIFEST which has become one of western Canada's major music festivals and which also attracts thousands of students annually. Over the years Nelson conducted over 300 concerts and clinic/workshops in western Canada and the United States, served as adjudicator or examiner at 80 music festivals and as guest conductor for bands, orchestras and choral groups. Nelson’s years as conductor of the Saskatoon Junior Symphony and the Saskatoon Symphony were times of tremendous growth. His Orchestral Development Program was recognized by the Canada Council as a "significant model of all of Canada". Nelson died of a heart attack in 1991, one year after retirement. The Dwaine Nelson Memorial Scholarship for Band, Conducting, and Orchestra honours Nelson.

Dwaine Nelson - Master Teacher Award Winner

Dwaine Nelson, Professor of Music, receives the Master Teacher Award from Bruce Schnell, Vice-President (Academic), at Convocation held at Centennial Auditorium.

Bio/Historical Note: Dwaine Darold Nelson was born in 1926 at Coteau, Burke County, North Dakota and began playing in the family band as a pre-teen. Nelson attended Minot State Teacher's College, Minot, North Dakota, where he majored in music and specialized in teaching brass. After marriage in 1954 he moved to Mohall, North Dakota, where Nelson became the choral and instrumental music teacher at Mohall High and Middle School. Under his direction, the band took many state honors. He was active in the community where he also directed the choir at the Mohall Methodist Church. During the summers he studied for his MA at Greeley Colorado State University. He was often called upon to conduct symphonics bands at the International Music Camp near the International Peace Gardens. Nelson then accepted a position as chairman of the music department and professor of music at Dickinson Teachers College, Dickinson, North Dakota, in 1958. There he founded the Tri-State Music Festival. In 1967 Nelson moved to Saskatoon, where he was Professor of Music at the University of Saskatchewan. He won the Master Teacher Award in 1990 as Professor Emeritus for his excellence in and dedication to teaching. Nelson was a driving force in the development of the Department of Music forming instrumental programs which grew from near non-existence to hundreds of participants. In 1978 he founded UNIFEST which has become one of western Canada's major music festivals and which also attracts thousands of students annually. Over the years Nelson conducted over 300 concerts and clinic/workshops in western Canada and the United States, served as adjudicator or examiner at 80 music festivals and as guest conductor for bands, orchestras and choral groups. Nelson’s years as conductor of the Saskatoon Junior Symphony and the Saskatoon Symphony were times of tremendous growth. His Orchestral Development Program was recognized by the Canada Council as a "significant model of all of Canada". Nelson died of a heart attack in 1991, one year after retirement. The Dwaine Nelson Memorial Scholarship for Band, Conducting, and Orchestra honours Nelson.

Dwaine Nelson

Series of four photographs and thirteen negatives of Dwaine Nelson, Professor Emeritus of Music, taken outside of Education Building.

Bio/Historical Note: Dwaine Darold Nelson was born in 1926 at Coteau, Burke County, North Dakota and began playing in the family band as a pre-teen. Nelson attended Minot State Teacher's College, Minot, North Dakota, where he majored in music and specialized in teaching brass. After marriage in 1954 he moved to Mohall, North Dakota, where Nelson became the choral and instrumental music teacher at Mohall High and Middle School. Under his direction, the band took many state honors. He was active in the community where he also directed the choir at the Mohall Methodist Church. During the summers he studied for his MA at Greeley Colorado State University. He was often called upon to conduct symphonics bands at the International Music Camp near the International Peace Gardens. Nelson then accepted a position as chairman of the music department and professor of music at Dickinson Teachers College, Dickinson, North Dakota, in 1958. There he founded the Tri-State Music Festival. In 1967 Nelson moved to Saskatoon, where he was Professor of Music at the University of Saskatchewan. He won the Master Teacher Award in 1990 as Professor Emeritus for his excellence in and dedication to teaching. Nelson was a driving force in the development of the Department of Music forming instrumental programs which grew from near non-existence to hundreds of participants. In 1978 he founded UNIFEST which has become one of western Canada's major music festivals and which also attracts thousands of students annually. Over the years Nelson conducted over 300 concerts and clinic/workshops in western Canada and the United States, served as adjudicator or examiner at 80 music festivals and as guest conductor for bands, orchestras and choral groups. Nelson’s years as conductor of the Saskatoon Junior Symphony and the Saskatoon Symphony were times of tremendous growth. His Orchestral Development Program was recognized by the Canada Council as a "significant model of all of Canada". Nelson died of a heart attack in 1991, one year after retirement. The Dwaine Nelson Memorial Scholarship for Band, Conducting, and Orchestra honours Nelson.

Dr. Dvoralai Wulfsohn - Portrait

Head and shoulders image of Dr. Dvoralai Wulfsohn, Department of Agricultural and Bioresource Engineering.

Bio/Historical Note: Dr. Dvoralai Wulfsohn earned her BSc (Hons) at the University of Newcastle upon Tyne; and an MS and a PhD from the University of California, Davis. She was assistant and associate professor of Agricultural and Bioresource Engineering at the University of Saskatchewan from 1991-1999. Dr. Wulfsohn was director of Geco Enterprises Centro de I+D, El Tambo, Chile, from 2011-March 2021.

Dr. Dvoralai Wulfsohn - Portrait

Head and shoulders image of Dr. Dvoralai Wulfsohn, Department of Agricultural and Bioresource Engineering.

Bio/Historical Note: Dr. Dvoralai Wulfsohn earned her BSc (Hons) at the University of Newcastle upon Tyne; and an MS and a PhD from the University of California, Davis. She was assistant and associate professor of Agricultural and Bioresource Engineering at the University of Saskatchewan from 1991-1999. Dr. Wulfsohn was director of Geco Enterprises Centro de I+D, El Tambo, Chile, from 2011-March 2021.

Duncan P. McColl - Portrait

Head and shoulders image of Duncan P. McColl, first University Registrar.

Bio/Historical Note: The first University employee was Duncan P. McColl, Registrar. This was one of two administrative positions named in the University Act of 1907. The other was President, which would not be filled for another year. McColl had been appointed Deputy Minister of Education in 1905 and would remain so until 1912. When he was named Registrar, the university was a concept — there were no buildings, faculty or staff. McColl was seen as an able administrator and quickly began the work of establishing convocation. This, in turn, elected the Senate which would create the Board of Governors. McColl resigned as Registrar in 1914 and was immediately named Secretary of the Board, where he served for another two decades. McColl was awarded an honourary degree from the U of S in 1928. Duncan McColl died in Vancouver in 1949.

Duff Spafford - Portrait

Head and shoulders image of Duff Spafford, Professor, Political Studies.

Bio/Historical Note: Dufferin Stewart Spafford was born 18 March 1936 at Weyburn, Saskatchewan, where his grandfather Dufferin Charles Spafford homesteaded in 1902. Living with his family on the farm and then in a succession of small towns left Duff with an enduring attachment to rural Saskatchewan. He grew up playing sports and played on hockey and baseball teams throughout his youth. After Duff’s high school years in Shellbrook, where he had a job at the weekly Chronicle and learned to set type, he worked as a city reporter and sometime sports editor at the Prince Albert Herald. There Duff became acquainted with the high school columnist, Shirley King, his future wife. As a student at the University of Saskatchewan, he was editor of The Sheaf in 1956-1957 and worked part-time at the Western Producer. After graduation, he went on to study at the London School of Economics, returning to Saskatchewan to teach, first in the joint Department of Economics and Political science, and then in Political Studies. Over Duff’s forty years as a professor, he made notable contributions to political studies and research on elections. Beyond academic life, he was full of ideas and enthusiasms, among them collecting, gardening, sports, and books. Duff assembled a significant collection of Saskatchewan archival materials and artifacts, including clay works made by the university's Department of Ceramics. He was a founding member and first treasurer of the Saskatchewan Perennial Society. After retirement Duff started the College Building Book Collection of writings by University of Saskatchewan student authors. He was passionate about the university and its history, particularly the achievements of its alumni, and in the course of his research discovered long forgotten notable graduates. In [2014] Duff was awarded an Alumni Achievement Award and was the first recipient of the USRA (University of Saskatchewan Retirees Association) Duff Spafford Award for Exceptional Service to the University Community, named in his honour. Duff died of a brain tumour on 14 May 2014 in Saskatoon.

Duff Spafford - Portrait

Head and shoulders image of Duff Spafford, Professor, Political Studies.

Bio/Historical Note: Dufferin Stewart Spafford was born 18 March 1936 at Weyburn, Saskatchewan, where his grandfather Dufferin Charles Spafford homesteaded in 1902. Living with his family on the farm and then in a succession of small towns left Duff with an enduring attachment to rural Saskatchewan. He grew up playing sports and played on hockey and baseball teams throughout his youth. After Duff’s high school years in Shellbrook, where he had a job at the weekly Chronicle and learned to set type, he worked as a city reporter and sometime sports editor at the Prince Albert Herald. There Duff became acquainted with the high school columnist, Shirley King, his future wife. As a student at the University of Saskatchewan, he was editor of The Sheaf in 1956-1957 and worked part-time at the Western Producer. After graduation, he went on to study at the London School of Economics, returning to Saskatchewan to teach, first in the joint Department of Economics and Political science, and then in Political Studies. Over Duff’s forty years as a professor, he made notable contributions to political studies and research on elections. Beyond academic life, he was full of ideas and enthusiasms, among them collecting, gardening, sports, and books. Duff assembled a significant collection of Saskatchewan archival materials and artifacts, including clay works made by the university's Department of Ceramics. He was a founding member and first treasurer of the Saskatchewan Perennial Society. After retirement Duff started the College Building Book Collection of writings by University of Saskatchewan student authors. He was passionate about the university and its history, particularly the achievements of its alumni, and in the course of his research discovered long forgotten notable graduates. In [2014] Duff was awarded an Alumni Achievement Award and was the first recipient of the USRA (University of Saskatchewan Retirees Association) Duff Spafford Award for Exceptional Service to the University Community, named in his honour. Duff died of a brain tumour on 14 May 2014 in Saskatoon.

Duff Spafford - Portrait

Head and shoulders image of Duff Spafford, Professor, Political Studies.

Bio/Historical Note: Dufferin Stewart Spafford was born 18 March 1936 at Weyburn, Saskatchewan, where his grandfather Dufferin Charles Spafford homesteaded in 1902. Living with his family on the farm and then in a succession of small towns left Duff with an enduring attachment to rural Saskatchewan. He grew up playing sports and played on hockey and baseball teams throughout his youth. After Duff’s high school years in Shellbrook, where he had a job at the weekly Chronicle and learned to set type, he worked as a city reporter and sometime sports editor at the Prince Albert Herald. There Duff became acquainted with the high school columnist, Shirley King, his future wife. As a student at the University of Saskatchewan, he was editor of The Sheaf in 1956-1957 and worked part-time at the Western Producer. After graduation, he went on to study at the London School of Economics, returning to Saskatchewan to teach, first in the joint Department of Economics and Political science, and then in Political Studies. Over Duff’s forty years as a professor, he made notable contributions to political studies and research on elections. Beyond academic life, he was full of ideas and enthusiasms, among them collecting, gardening, sports, and books. Duff assembled a significant collection of Saskatchewan archival materials and artifacts, including clay works made by the university's Department of Ceramics. He was a founding member and first treasurer of the Saskatchewan Perennial Society. After retirement Duff started the College Building Book Collection of writings by University of Saskatchewan student authors. He was passionate about the university and its history, particularly the achievements of its alumni, and in the course of his research discovered long forgotten notable graduates. In [2014] Duff was awarded an Alumni Achievement Award and was the first recipient of the USRA (University of Saskatchewan Retirees Association) Duff Spafford Award for Exceptional Service to the University Community, named in his honour. Duff died of a brain tumour on 14 May 2014 in Saskatoon.

Dudley Newell

Dudley Newell, announcer librarian at CJUS-FM, operating in the central room of the station.

Bio/Historical Note: In 1959, a campus group calling themselves "University Radio Productions" approached the federal government for a broadcast license to operate a student-run FM station on a non-commercial basis. Licensing requirements demanded that licenses only be issued to the university itself; in 1960 students approached the Board of Governors for approval. Operation of the station, including a constitution, was formalized in 1965 between the University and the Students Union (USSU), and CJUS-FM was launched. Studios were initially located in the basement of the university's Memorial Union Building, but were moved to the basement of the Education Building in 1980 next to the Department of Audio Visual Services. The station was launched through a partnership between the university's board of governors and its student union. For a number of years, the station also aired some programming from the CBC Stereo network before CBKS was launched. In 1983, with the station in financial trouble, it began to accept limited commercial advertising, and briefly changed its call sign to CHSK. The following year, the university's board decided to discontinue its funding of the station, and CHSK ceased broadcasting on 30 September 1985.

Dr. Zoltan Hajnal - Portrait

Head and shoulders passport photo of Dr. Zoltan (Zoli) Hajnal, Professor of Geological Sciences.

Bio/Historical Note: Dr. Zoltan (Zoli) Hajnal was born in Cegled, Hungary, a small town 60 km from Budapest. He received his elementary and high school education in his homeland and was a fourth-year student at the University of Sopron in 1956 when the Hungary revolution broke out. After the revolution Dr. Hajnal left Hungary and made his way to Canada and Saskatchewan. He completed his post-secondary education at the University of Saskatchewan where he obtained a BEng in Geophysics in 1961, and an MA in Geophysics in 1963, both at the University of Saskatchewan. Dr. Hajnal then worked as an interpretation geophysicist for Chevron Standard in Calgary from 1963-1965 but went back to academia to obtain his PhD in Seismology from the University of Manitoba in 1970. On completion of his PhD. Dr. Hajnal returned to the U of S as a faculty member. Dr. Hajnal has authored or co-authored some 90 papers, about half of which have pertain to research carried out on surficial sediments or lithospheric and mantle materials underlying Saskatchewan (2021).

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