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Better Farming Train - Staff and Crew

Group photo of staff standing on and in front of a train engine. Names: Christina Murray, A.W. Henry, A.R. Greig, Jean Bayer, Walter Kirkpatrick, A.S. Kyle, K.G. McKay, Miss Frank, Miss Fawcett, Miss Gillespie, Mrs. Archibald, A.M. Shaw, F. Bates, G.B. Harrington, W.H.J. Tisdale, E. Booth.

Bio/historical note: The Better Farming Train served as an agricultural college on wheels. Sponsored by the Provincial Government and the Extension Department of the University of Saskatchewan, these trains were in common use during the summers from about 1914-1920. Consisting of lecture, exhibit, and demonstration cars, visitors were informed concerning agricultural products, equipment, and practices.

Better Farming Train - Staff

Staff members of the Better Farming Train, including R. Archibald, Mrs. Archibald, W.H.J. Tisdale, C. Morrison, F. Bradshaw, T.N. Willing, J.B. Harrington, A.E. Lloyd, Miss Gillespie and J.G. Rayner all seated at tables.

Bio/historical note: The Better Farming Train served as an agricultural college on wheels. Sponsored by the Provincial Government and the Extension Department of the University of Saskatchewan, these trains were in common use during the summers from about 1914-1920. Consisting of lecture, exhibit, and demonstration cars, visitors were informed concerning agricultural products, equipment, and practices.

Better Farming Train - Staff - Group Photo

Group photo taken outdoors of staff: T.N. Willing, A.E. Potts, Dean Davidson, H.B. Josephson, [? McGee], A.S. Kyle, T.G. Loveridge, J. Bridge, [Roy Hanson], H.B. Summerfeldt, A.R. Greig, Mrs. Elva Currie, Miss Gillespie, Jean Murray, [? Campbell], and J.B. Harrington.

Bio/historical note: The Better Farming Train served as an agricultural college on wheels. Sponsored by the Provincial Government and the Extension Department of the University of Saskatchewan, these trains were in common use during the summers from about 1914-1920. Consisting of lecture, exhibit, and demonstration cars, visitors were informed concerning agricultural products, equipment, and practices.

Honourary Degrees - Presentation - J.B. Harrington

J.W.T. Spinks, University President, shaking hands with J.B. Harrington, recipient of an Honourary Degree at 52nd annual convocation ceremony held in Physical Education gymnasium. Norman Cram, University Secretary, stands behind recipient.

Bio/Historical Note: James Bishop Harrington, born in Chicago in 1894, came to Canada in 1911 and settled on a homestead near Maple Creek, Saskatchewan. Four years later he started what was to become a distinguished academic career when he enrolled at the University of Saskatchewan. Though his studies were interrupted by war service, he received his B.Sc. in Agriculture in 1920. Harrington continued with graduate studies at the University of Minnesota. By 1924 he had a MSc, a Ph.D. and an appointment as Assistant Professor in Field Husbandry at the University of Saskatchewan. From 1950 to 1956 served as head of his department. During his years at the U of S, Harrington built an international reputation as a plant breeder; among the better known crop varieties he developed are Apex wheat, Fortune oats, Husky barley, Royal flax and Antelope rye. In 1949 Dr. Harrington's attention turned to the agricultural problems of the third world. In 1949-1950 he worked in Egypt as consultant to the Ministry of Agriculture, and in 1952 went to India to work on rice breeding for the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) of the United Nations. After resigning from the U of S in 1956, Harrington continued as a consultant with the FAO in the Middle East. Harrington was a founding member of the Saskatchewan Institute of Agrology and served as president of the Agriculture Institute of Canada. Many honours include the Order of Canada, Fellow of the American Society of Agronomy and an Honourary Degree in 1963 from the U of S. He died in Ontario in [1979] at age 85.

J.B. Harrington - Portrait

Head and shoulders of J.B. Harrington, Dean of Graduate Studies and Professor of Physics; likely taken at the time of presentation of an Honourary Degree from the University of Saskatchewan.

Bio/Historical Note: James Bishop Harrington, born in Chicago in 1894, came to Canada in 1911 and settled on a homestead near Maple Creek, Saskatchewan. Four years later he started what was to become a distinguished academic career when he enrolled at the University of Saskatchewan. Though his studies were interrupted by war service, he received his B.Sc. in Agriculture in 1920. Harrington continued with graduate studies at the University of Minnesota. By 1924 he had a MSc, a Ph.D. and an appointment as Assistant Professor in Field Husbandry at the University of Saskatchewan. From 1950 to 1956 served as head of his department. During his years at the U of S, Harrington built an international reputation as a plant breeder; among the better known crop varieties he developed are Apex wheat, Fortune oats, Husky barley, Royal flax and Antelope rye. In 1949 Dr. Harrington's attention turned to the agricultural problems of the third world. In 1949-1950 he worked in Egypt as consultant to the Ministry of Agriculture, and in 1952 went to India to work on rice breeding for the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) of the United Nations. After resigning from the U of S in 1956, Harrington continued as a consultant with the FAO in the Middle East. Harrington was a founding member of the Saskatchewan Institute of Agrology and served as president of the Agriculture Institute of Canada. Many honours include the Order of Canada, Fellow of the American Society of Agronomy and an Honourary Degree in 1963 from the U of S. He died in Ontario in [1979] at age 85.

J. B. Harrington - Portrait

Head and shoulders image of J.B. Harrington, Professor, College of Agriculture.

Bio/Historical Note: James Bishop Harrington, born in Chicago in 1894, came to Canada in 1911 and settled on a homestead near Maple Creek, Saskatchewan. Four years later he started what was to become a distinguished academic career when he enrolled at the University of Saskatchewan. Though his studies were interrupted by war service, he received his B.Sc. in Agriculture in 1920. Harrington continued with graduate studies at the University of Minnesota. By 1924 he had a MSc, a Ph.D. and an appointment as Assistant Professor in Field Husbandry at the University of Saskatchewan. From 1950 to 1956 served as head of his department. During his years at the U of S, Harrington built an international reputation as a plant breeder; among the better known crop varieties he developed are Apex wheat, Fortune oats, Husky barley, Royal flax and Antelope rye. In 1949 Dr. Harrington's attention turned to the agricultural problems of the third world. In 1949-1950 he worked in Egypt as consultant to the Ministry of Agriculture, and in 1952 went to India to work on rice breeding for the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) of the United Nations. After resigning from the U of S in 1956, Harrington continued as a consultant with the FAO in the Middle East. Harrington was a founding member of the Saskatchewan Institute of Agrology and served as president of the Agriculture Institute of Canada. Many honours include the Order of Canada, Fellow of the American Society of Agronomy and a LLD from the U of S. He died in Ontario in [1979] at age 85.

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