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Names

210th Overseas Battalion

  • Corporate body
  • 1916-19?

The 210th Battalion was authorized in March 1916 in Moose Jaw when Major W.E. Seaborn of the 128th Battalion was promoted to the rank of Lieutenant Colonel, and requested to recruit the 210th Battalion. Recruiting was very popular with the young men of Moose Jaw and district. The new battalion grew very quickly to 521 members. The recruits were accommodated in the Douglas Block on Main St. for summer training of drill and military discipline the battalion moved to Camp Hughes. Owing to the lack of transport, the battalion did not proceed overseas from the camp, but returned to the Douglas Barracks where they underwent further training. On April 12, 1917 the battalion left Halifax on the S.S. Carpathia. A smaller contingent left a week later on the S.S. Northland. The S.S. Carpathia docked at Liverpool on April 22, 1917. The battalion immediately left for Camp Bramshott where they remained as a unit for two weeks. The war situation demanded that the battalion was to be used to provide reinforcements for the hard hit battalions in France. The majority were absorbed into the 46th Battalion and the 1st Canadian Mounted Rifles. Some officers went to the Royal Flying Corps. Casualties of the 210th Battalion serving with the 46th Battalion were 52 killed, 127 wounded, 3 taken prisoner of war. Casualties of those serving in the other units is not available. The 210th Battalion was disbanded and removed from army records.

46th Battalion (South Saskatchewan), C.E.F.√

  • SCAA-UASC-0001
  • Corporate body
  • November 7, 1914 - August 30, 1920

A memorial stone and plaque honouring the memory of those who served with the 46th Canadian Infantry Battalion (South Saskatchewan ), Canadian Expeditionary Force, 1914-1918, rests under a tree on the northeast corner of the Bowl. "Designed by a well known sculptor of Winnipeg", it was presented to the University at a solemn ceremony in Convocation Hall on November 11, 1933. The Great War exacted a heavy toll on the U of S. Of the 336 students, faculty and staff who enlisted, 67 "passed out of the sight of man by the path of duty and self-sacrifice". More than 100 more were wounded and 33 were awarded medals of valour. The School of Engineering closed its doors for the 1916-1917 session when the faculty and students enlisted en masse. Formed in February of 1915, the 46th Canadian Infantry Battalion (South Saskatchewan ) was to have a strength of 600 men. Its ranks were filled primarily with Saskatchewan youths, many via the University of Saskatchewan. Also known as the "Suicide Battalion", it fought in some of the bloodiest encounters of the war. Reinforcements were constantly needed as battle after battle decimated its ranks. Of the 5,374 men in the 46th Battalion, 4,917 were either killed or wounded. A particularly costly battle was Passchendaele, where there were 403 casualties from the battalion's strength of 600 men. With the end of the war came demobilization and the end of 46th Battalion. The soldiers became veterans and returned to civilian life. Many re-enrolled or entered the university for the first time. Many others did not return. Among those honoured on the plaque are Harold Blair and Reginald Batemen, two members of faculty killed in France.

8th Reconnaissance Regiment

  • SCAA-SCM-0001
  • Corporate body
  • 1941-1958

Eight Recce was formed at Guillemont Barracks, near Aldershot in southern England, on March 11, 1941, by merging three existing squadrons within the division. Its first commanding officer was Lieutenant Colonel Churchill C. Mann. Mann was succeeded as commanding officer on September 26, 1941, by Lieutenant Colonel P. A. Vokes, who was in turn followed on February 18, 1944, by Lieutenant Colonel M. A. Alway. The last commanding officer was Major "Butch" J. F. Merner, appointed to replace Alway a couple of months before the end of the fighting in Europe.

8 Recce had its roots in the 14th Canadian Light Horse, a militia unit formed in 1920. One source claims the unit was the union of the 27th Light Horse and the 14th Canadian Mounted Rifles, but the official lineage shows no amalgamation in 1920, just a renaming of the 27th Light Horse. Authoritative lists of units in the Active Militia and the Canadian Expeditionary Force show no record of a "14th Canadian Mounted Rifles" – there were only 13 regiments of mounted rifles organized in the CEF. In any event, the 14th Canadian Light Horse in the 1920s was headquartered in Swift Current, Saskatchewan. It comprised 'A', 'B' and 'C' Squadrons based at Swift Current, Swift Current and Shuanavon, respectively. In 1937 the regiment was designated a mechanized unit, and in 1940 the regiment was renamed the 14th Canadian Hussars. In 1941 an Active Service regiment was mobilized, and its members joined with other reconnaissance personnel in England to form 8 Recce.

A.B.

Abbey Pastoral Charge

  • SCAA-UCCS-0232
  • Corporate body
  • 1925–1957, ca.1970–1972

Abbey Pastoral Charge was formed as a new United Church charge in 1925, containing preaching points at Abbey, Shackleton and Badger Mound. Later additions included preaching points at Lancer, Portreeve, and Lemsford. In 1957, the charge combined with Leader Pastoral Charge (including Leader, Sceptre and Prelate) to form Leader-Sceptre-Abbey Pastoral Charge. Sometime near 1970, Abbey United Church separated, forming Abbey-Trinity Pastoral Charge. Around 1972, Lancer and Portreeve joined with Abbey to become Abbey-Lancer-Portreeve Pastoral Charge.

Abbey-Lancer-Portreeve Pastoral Charge

  • SCAA-UCCS-0231
  • Corporate body
  • ca.1972–

Abbey-Lancer-Portreeve Pastoral Charge was formed around 1972, from the combination of Abbey-Trinity Pastoral Charge with the preaching points at Lancer and Portreeve (previously part of Leader-Sceptre Pastoral Charge).

Aberdeen Pastoral Charge

  • SCAA-UCCS-0401
  • Corporate body
  • ca.1997–2008

Aberdeen Pastoral Charge was created, between 1994 and 1997. Prior to this, the Aberdeen congregation had been part of Vonda Pastoral Charge (ca.1925) and later TRI charge (to ca.1994), along with Rosthern St. Andrews and Wakaw. The Aberdeen Charge was officially closed April 20, 2008.

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