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Major General Arthur E. Potts - Portrait

Head and shoulders image of Major General Arthur E. Potts.

Bio/Historical Note: Arthur Edward Potts CBE, ED (1890-1983) was born on 24 October 1890 in Northumberland, United Kingdom, Potts was educated at George Heriot's School in Edinburgh and subsequently studied at the University of Edinburgh (bachelor of science) and Cornell University (master's degree in agriculture). He worked as an instructor at Ames College in Iowa. In 1915, Potts left Ames College to enlist in the Second Universities Company at McGill University and was attached to the Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry as a private. This unit was sent to France where Potts fought in the trenches and was wounded. In September 1916, he was promoted to lieutenant. At the end of 1917, Potts was sent to the education office, to give lectures to soldiers about agriculture. He soon rejoined his battalion. After being wounded on 7 September 1918, he was sent to England for convalescence. Potts was still recuperating from his wounds when the war ended. After the war, Potts joined the University of Saskatchewan as head of the dairy department. Besides his normal work as "Professor of Dairying”, he served in the Canadian militia and took over the university's officer training corps, reorganizing it and training personnel. Potts was promoted to the rank of colonel in 1934. In the same year, he became commander of the Saskatoon Non-Permanent Active Militia garrison and officer commanding of the 19th Infantry Brigade. Shortly after the outbreak of World War II, Potts received a request from then Major-General Andrew McNaughton to accept demotion and take over the Saskatoon Light Infantry. Potts accepted and took the unit to Europe in December 1939. In July 1940, he was promoted to brigadier and took over the command of the 2nd Canadian Infantry Brigade. He led the brigade in Operation Gauntlet, the commando raid at Spitsbergen. In May 1942 he became General Officer Commanding 6th Infantry Division with the rank of major-general. That appointment took Potts from the United Kingdom to the Pacific shores in British Columbia. In 1943 he was appointed commander of Military District 2 in Toronto. He stayed there until the end of the war. After the war Potts joined the Department of Veterans Affairs. He moved to Kingston, Ontario in 1949, to become the Department's district administrator. Potts retired in 1955 and died in Kingston, Ontario, in 1983.

Mark J.C. Abley - Portrait

Head and shoulders image of Mark J.C. Abley, Rhodes Scholar.

Bio/Historical Note: Mark J.C.Abley was born in England in 1955. When he was a small child his family moved to Canada, and he grew up in northern Ontario, southern Alberta and Saskatoon. Abley’s father Harry was for many years organist-choirmaster at St. John’s Cathedral and Third Avenue United Church, and several theatres in Saskatoon. Abley studied literature at the University of Saskatchewan and, after winning a Rhodes Scholarship in 1975 at St. John’s College, Oxford. He won prizes for his poetry while a student at St John's College, Oxford, and began to write full-time after moving to Toronto in 1978. He has been a contributing editor of both Maclean's and Saturday Night magazines, and a frequent contributor to The Times Literary Supplement. His writings show an interest in endangered languages. He published a memoir, The Organist: Fugues, Fatherhood, and a Fragile Mind, in 2019.

Convocation - Awards - Copland Prize - Mark J.C. Abley

D.R. Cherry, dean, Arts and Sciences presents the award to Mark J.C. Abley at Convocation ceremony held in Physical Education gymnasium.

Bio/Historical Note: Mark J.C. Abley was born in England in 1955. When he was a small child his family moved to Canada, and he grew up in northern Ontario, southern Alberta and Saskatoon. Abley’s father Harry was for many years organist-choirmaster at St. John’s Cathedral and Third Avenue United Church, and several theatres in Saskatoon. Abley studied literature at the University of Saskatchewan and, after winning a Rhodes Scholarship in 1975 at St. John’s College, Oxford. He won prizes for his poetry while a student at St John's College, Oxford, and began to write full-time after moving to Toronto in 1978. He has been a contributing editor of both Maclean's and Saturday Night magazines, and a frequent contributor to The Times Literary Supplement. His writings show an interest in endangered languages. He published a memoir, The Organist: Fugues, Fatherhood, and a Fragile Mind, in 2019.

May Kenderdine Beamish - Portrait

Portrait of M. Beamish, daughter of painter Gus Kenderdine and benefactor to the University of Saskatchewan, wearing black rimmed glasses and a corsage.

Head and shoulders image of May Kenderdine Beamish. daughter of painter Gus Kenderdine and benefactor to the University of Saskatchewan, wearing black rimmed glasses and a corsage.

Lucy Murray - Portrait

Head and shoulders image of Lucy Murray with a band in her hair and wearing an academic gown.

Bio/Historical Note: Born in 1902 in Nova Scotia, Lucy Hunter Murray was the second daughter of Walter C. Murray, the University of Saskatchewan's first president, and Christina Cameron Murray. Lucy Murray received her BA at the University of Saskatchewan in 1923 and her MA from the University of Toronto in 1925. Then followed a B.Ed. degree in 1933 at the University of Saskatchewan where she received the McColl scholarship in 1933. Murray earned a Ph.D. at the University of Chicago in 1935. She joined the Regina College's department of English in 1936 and was an Associate Professor there at the time of her death in 1967. Murray was given the Cliff Shaw Memorial Award for her contributions to the Blue Jay, the journal of the Saskatchewan Natural History Society.

Lucy Murray - Portrait

Signed passport picture of Lucy Murray wearing a dark coloured suit with a necklace at top of the collar.

Bio/Historical Note: Born in 1902 in Nova Scotia, Lucy Hunter Murray was the second daughter of Walter C. Murray, the University of Saskatchewan's first president, and Christina Cameron Murray. Lucy Murray received her BA at the University of Saskatchewan in 1923 and her MA from the University of Toronto in 1925. Then followed a B.Ed. degree in 1933 at the University of Saskatchewan where she received the McColl scholarship in 1933. Murray earned a Ph.D. at the University of Chicago in 1935. She joined the Regina College's department of English in 1936 and was an Associate Professor there at the time of her death in 1967. Murray was given the Cliff Shaw Memorial Award for her contributions to the Blue Jay, the journal of the Saskatchewan Natural History Society.

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