Showing 376 results

Archival description
University of Saskatchewan - Administration Building√
Advanced search options
Print preview View:

321 results with digital objects Show results with digital objects

College Building - Sod Turning

Image showing the first sod turning for the proposed College Building on the University of Saskatchewan campus. Dignitaries in attendance: E.L. Wetmore, University Chancellor; Walter C. Murray, University President; Rev. Colin G. Young, James Alexander Aikin, A.H. Smith, Thomas Edwin Perrett, D. Smith (contractor), Joseph Wright Sifton, W.J. Bell, George H. Ling, Duncan P. McColl, Augustus H. Ball, William Hopkins (mayor), William Rolston Sparling, Alexander R. Greig, J.C. Bell, William C. Sutherland, Ethan B. Hutcherson, Archibald P. McNab, James Alexander Calder, Asa Hutchinson, George E. McCraney, Mrs. Elizabeth Jane McCraney, P.E. MacKenzie, and Mrs. Agnes MacKenzie. Engineer's survey pole at centre of image.

Bio/Historical Note: Designated as a provincial heritage property in 1982 and as a National Historic Site in 2001, the University of Saskatchewan's first building has long served as the architectural, intellectual and emotional cornerstone of the campus. Designed by Brown and Vallance, the College Building was originally intended ultimately to house the College of Agriculture; but from the start, served numerous purposes. As early as April 1910, the floor plan included space for milk testing, butter making, cheese making, grain work; a gymnasium; several classrooms; offices for the Registrar, Dean of Agriculture, Director of Extension, and President; the original "faculty club"; laboratories; the library; and quarters for the janitor. After a sod-turning ceremony on 4 May 1910, the cornerstone was laid by Prime Minister Wilfrid Laurier on 29 July 1910. It was constructed between 1910-1912 by Smith Bros. and Wilson general contractors. The building was officially opened by Walter Scott, Premier of Saskatchewan, on 1 May 1913. The College Building serves as a memorial to much of the university's history: numerous plaques to individuals and organizations can be found in its interior, including memorial ribbons honouring members of the university community who served in the First World War. In 1997 the university created "Nobel Plaza" in front of the College Building, honouring two Nobel Laureates associated with the University: Gerhard Herzberg and Henry Taube. As the university grew, the College Building gradually became the administrative centre for the university. By the 1950s most of the original teaching facilities were taken over by new or expanded offices including those of the registrar, controller, alumni and news services, and presidential staff. The building became known as the Administration Building at this point, and later the "old Administration Building" to distinguish it from the new wing. This expansion continued through the 1960s and 1970s, particularly with the appointment of a university secretary and vice-presidents. While Convocation Hall became too small for regular Convocation ceremonies by 1930, it maintained its original, broader function as a venue for concerts, meetings, lectures, and other events. Parts of the building were declared to be unsafe in 1979, which led to the construction of the new wing of the Administration Building, opened in 1987. Most of the original building was closed, but Convocation Hall remained in use until 1997. The building was reopened and officially rededicated as the College Building in September 2005 after a major rehabilitation project. The rehabilitation was reported to be "one of the largest heritage conservation projects in Canada - second only to the work being done on Parliament Hill." In addition to senior administrative offices and Convocation Hall, it became home to the Museum of Antiquities and new gallery space for the University Art Collection. Upon completion in 2012 the University Board of Governors renamed the Administration Building the Peter MacKinnon Building, in honour of Peter MacKinnon, retiring University President and a driving force behind the project.

Learned Societies Conference - Convocation - Academic Procession

Dignitaries parading from the Administration Building to the special convocation ceremonies in the Bowl during the Learned Societies Conference, U of S, 22 May-8 June 1979.

Bio/historical note: A special convocation was held 2 June 1979 to celebrate the "Learned Societies Conference". It was 20 years since the last conference was held at the University of Saskatchewan. Honourary Doctor of Literature (D.Litt.) degrees were conferred on four outstanding scholars: Jean Sutherland Boggs, Sir Moses I. Finley, Amartya Kumar Sen, and Arthur G.C. Whalley.

Bio/Historical Note: Learned Societies, a term applied in Canada to the large group of scholarly organizations that hold conferences annually from late May to mid-June at a different university location each year. Society members come not only to hear and discuss scholarly papers on the latest work in their fields, but also to renew contacts and share common concerns. The gathering of these associations in one place over one period is distinctively Canadian and owes more to practical evolution than to planning power. Selecting one site with suitable university accommodation was an answer to Canadian distance that allowed scholars more economical joint arrangements, let them attend meetings of societies besides their own, and encouraged them to visit varied geographical areas. The older Royal Society opened the way by moving from its Ottawa base to annual conferences at Montréal, Kingston or Toronto. Younger, more specialized associations - such as those in history, political science and economics - joined in, holding their own meetings along with, or just following, the senior scholarly society. By the 1930s the practice of holding an annual learned-conference period at a different site each year was well established, though such sites were usually in central Canada, where most larger universities were located. But in 1949 "the Learneds" went to Halifax, and soon afterwards to Winnipeg, Edmonton and Vancouver. In April 1996, the conference name was changed to the Congress of the Humanities and Social Sciences.

College Building - Exterior

Elevated view of the Bowl and College Building at centre; Crop Science and Engineering buildings at left. Taken from roof of Qu'Appelle Hall.

Bio/Historical Note: The College Building has changed names over the years. The “Administration Building” came into use by the 1950s and the “College Building” was back in use in 1987. Upon Peter MacKinnon’s retirement as University President in 2012, the building was renamed the “Peter MacKinnon Building."

Early Campus Buildings

Elevated view looking east across the Bowl showing cars on road and people walking on pathways. Campus buildings in background (l to r): Physics Building, College Building, Saskatchewan Hall and Qu'Appelle Hall. Taken from the roof of the Chemistry Building.

College Building - Exterior

Looking east at College Building at centre; landscaping and road in foreground. Engineering Building at left; Saskatchewan Hall at right.

Bio/Historical Note: The College Building has changed names over the years. The “Administration Building” came into use by the 1950s and the “College Building” was back in use in 1987. Upon Peter MacKinnon’s retirement as University President in 2012, the building was renamed the “Peter MacKinnon Building."

College Building and Saskatchewan Hall

Looking east across the Bowl at flower beds and road in foreground. College Building at left; Saskatchewan Hall at right.

Bio/Historical Note: The College Building has changed names over the years. The “Administration Building” came into use by the 1950s and the “College Building” was back in use in 1987. Upon Peter MacKinnon’s retirement as University President in 2012, the building was renamed the “Peter MacKinnon Building”.

Results 1 to 15 of 376