Showing 385 results

Names
University of Saskatchewan, University Archives & Special Collections

Abley, Henry T.

  • Person
  • 1917-1994

Henry T. Abley, also often known as Harry, was an organist, choirmaster and composer, born in 1917 in Knighton, Wales. He studied at Trinity College of Music, London. He had fellowships at that college, and the London College of Music, and was an Associate of the Royal College of Organists.

He immigrated to Canada in the late 50s and worked as the organist at St. Luke’s Cathedral in Sault Ste Marie, ON from 1957-1959. From 1961-1967 he worked as the organist at First Baptist Church in Lethbridge, Alberta. Subsequently he worked as an organist and choirmaster at St. John’s Cathedral in Saskatoon, SK from 1968-1977, then at Third Avenue United Church also in Saskatoon, SK from 1979-1985. His last engagement as organist and choirmaster was at Church of the Advent in Montreal from 1985 until his death in 1994.

He was a recitalist known especially in Germany during the 70s and 80s, where he performed frequently in East and West Berlin, Bremen, Norden; as well as Geneva, Switzerland and Oxford and Cambridge, England. He excelled in music of the German School, but was also a fine exponent of Franck, Liszt, and 20th-century composers Olivier Messiaen and Jéhan Alain. Abley was also a composer of mainly sacred works, and his large output occasioned a 1981 concert in Saskatoon composed entirely of his music.

Abrahamson, Joanne Margaret

  • SCAA-UASC-MG244
  • Person
  • 24 January 1963 - present

Joanne Abrahamson was born in Saskatoon on 24 January 1963. She worked for most of her career at SaskTel; after nearly twenty years there she left to pursue a career in Library Studies. Her father was a police photographer, and the family had a darkroom in their home; but she is largely self-taught, and has taken no formal photographic training.

Adaskin, Murray

  • SCAA-UASC-MG298
  • Person
  • 1906-2002

Born in Toronto on March 28, 1906, Murray Adaskin began his violin training at the age of ten. Additional training was received in New York and Paris including periods of composition study with John Weinzweig, Charles Jones and Darius Milhaud. A violinist with Toronto Symphony for ten years, Adaskin also served as director of music for the CPR hotels. As Head of the Music Department at the University of Saskatchewan from 1952 until 1966, and then Composer-In-Residence from 1966 until 1973, Murray, along with his first wife soprano Frances James Adaskin, initiated and supported much of the rich musical life which remains as a cultural focus in Saskatoon today. Among his many honours were Saskatoon's citizen of the year for 1970, a 1980 appointment to the Order of Canada and a D.Mus from the University of Saskatchewan in 1984. Murray Adaskin retired to Victoria in 1973. He was later married to Dorothea Larken (Adaskin). He composed his final work in 2000 and died in 2002 at the age of 96.

Agricultural Building (University of Saskatchewan)

  • UASC0003
  • Buildings and structures
  • 1988-present

Original plans for the Agriculture Building had it joining Kirk Hall, the John Mitchell Building and Crop Science, but the architects, Folstad-Friggstad, instructed to provide “a highly visible complex for the College,” proposed a stand-alone building intended to state the importance of the College of Agriculture to the University. It is the first major building on campus clad with glass rather than brick or stone.

The original structure cost $91,000,000 and was constructed between 1988-1991. It consisted of five floors, with 164 research labs, 38 teaching labs, 182 offices, 9 classrooms, 4 computer training facilities, 6 conference rooms, and 167 controlled environment plant growth facilities. In addition it has an impressive inner courtyard, the Atrium, and is home to the Kenderdine Gallery, named in honour of the University’s first art instructor.

Numerous private and corporate donors contributed to the building fund.

The structure had been designed to enable future expansion, and by 2000 a sixth floor was added at a construction cost of $10,000,000. The new addition was intended to house Animal and Poultry Science, Food Science, and Bioinsecticide Research.

Agricultural Students' Association (University of Saskatchewan)

  • Corporate body
  • 1920-

The first meeting of the Agricultural Students' Association of the University of Saskatchewan was held on March 20, 1920. It was formed as "a result of the cessation of the War, with its consequent effects in student enrollment." With greater numbers of students, "many new organizations [appeared, which] caused considerable overlapping in student activities with no central body in control." At the request of his fellow students, 4th-year president J.B. Harrington called a general meeting of College of Agriculture students on February 10, 1920. A subcommittee was formed to draft a constitution; that constitution was approved, and the ASA officially formed in March. Among the objectives of the Association was the development of rural leadership and the promotion of agricultural education in the province; although, as with most student organizations, its primary function was to promote fellowship among the students and to serve as a medium of communication between students and faculty.

Alexander, Helen Emmeline (nee Shirriff)

  • Person
  • 1898-1992

Helen Emmeline Shirriff was born 10 January 1898 in Brandon, Manitoba. She married Robert Alexander in 1919; together they farmed at Portreeve, Saskatchewan, until Robert's death in 1955. Helen remained actively involved in the management of the farm until her death. In addition, Helen was a schoolteacher. Her long career in education began in 1916, and took her to various locations throughout the north and west, including Athabaska Landing (1918), Whitehorse (1956), and the Glidden Hutterite Colony (1967). She died in Saskatoon on 6 April 1992.

Allely, John Stuart Mill

  • SCAA-UASC-0005
  • Person
  • 1904-1986

Born in Norland, Ontario in 1904, John Stuart Mill Allely studied Economics at Queen's University, earning a BA in 1929 and an MA in 1930. He did further postgraduate study at Harvard University, receiving an AM degree in 1932. He married Phyllis Parkin in September 1934. Prior to his appointment at the University of Saskatchewan in 1939, he taught at a number of institutions including McMaster University, the Universities of British Columbia, Manitoba, and Alberta, and the Carnegie Institute of Technology. He was on the staff of the Royal Commission on Dominion-Provincial Relations (Rowell-Sirois Commission) in 1937 and 1938. Allely took a leave of absence to serve in the Canadian Army in World War Two. He served in Ottawa in the Adjutant General’s Branch and the General Staff. He held the rank of Lieutenant-Colonel in the Canadian Army and was seconded to the British Army to serve as the Senior Finance Officer of the Control Commission for Germany (British Element) from 1944 to 1946. Allely returned to the University of Saskatchewan in 1947. Following the Second World War, he served as Officer Commanding of the Saskatchewan Contingent, Canadian Officers Training Corps from 1947 to 1957. Professor Allely retired from the University in 1972 and died in Saskatoon on March 23, 1986.

Allen, William

  • Person
  • 1892-1941

William “Bill” Allen was born in Bristol, England on May 9, 1892. He immigrated to Canada with his family in 1911, setting up a homestead near Smiley, Saskatchewan. He joined the Army in 1916 and was wounded at the Somme, which resulted in the amputation of most of his left arm. After he was discharged from the armed forces in 1917, he enrolled at the University of Saskatchewan in the College of Agriculture. In 1922, he received his BSA from the University of Saskatchewan and went on to do graduate work at Harvard and Cornell, where he earned a PhD in Agricultural Economics in 1925. He married Gwendolen Woodward in 1926. He returned to the University of Saskatchewan and established the Department of Farm Management, of which he was Head until his resignation in 1938. During his time at the University, Allen directed a provincial soil survey in 1935 and was in charge of the first major debt survey of rural Saskatchewan in 1936. Allen was a member of the Provincial Milk Control Board, the Saskatchewan Land Utilization Board, the International Council of Agricultural Economists, and the Canadian Society of Technical Agriculturists. In 1938, he was appointed the first Agricultural Commissioner for Canada in the United Kingdom. During World War Two, Allen’s duties included keeping Britain supplied with Canadian food and to negotiate trade agreements covering the sale of Canada’s agricultural products to Britain. Allen was a passenger on the S.S. Nerissa when it was sunk by a torpedo off the west coast of Scotland on April 30, 1941. Allen was listed as missing and presumed dead. Allen is memorialized with a plaque in Convocation Hall on the University of Saskatchewan campus and an annual award in the College of Agriculture.

Allison, Carlyle

  • Person
  • 1907-1972

Carlyle Allison was a journalist, and close friend and advisor of Prime Minister John Diefenbaker. Born in Staynor, Ontario in 1907, his family moved to Winnipeg when he was a child. He attended the University of Manitoba (B.A., 1926). His journalism career started immediately after graduation: starting as a reporter and editor with the Winnipeg Tribune, 1926-1928; and reporter, bureau chief and editor with the Saskatoon Star-Phoenix, 1928-1935. After a brief stint with the Montreal Gazette, he returned to the Winnipeg Tribune, progressing through the ranks as managing editor (1944), editor (1946), and editor-in-chief (1951). In 1958, he was appointed by Prime Minister Diefenbaker as a full-time (and founding) member of the Board of Broadcast Governors, the precursor to the CRTC. He served as Vice-Chairman between December 1960 and 1965, but his term was not renewed by the new Liberal government. Subsequently he worked for CJAY-TV in Winnipeg, until his retirement in 1971. He died in February 1972.

Alpha Omega Society

  • Corporate body

The Alpha Omega Society was created in 1930. Its objective was to "foster such social and intellectual activities as will bring the students of Ukrainian descent into a closer bond and a clearer understanding withe the rest of the University."

Altschul, Rudolf

  • Person
  • 1901-1963

Rudolf Altschul was born in Prague, Czechoslovakia, 24 February 1901. He graduated as a Doctor of Universal Medicine from the German University in Prague in 1925, and did postgraduate work in neurology and neuropathology in Paris and Rome. In 1939 he and his wife were forced to flee the Nazi occupation of Czechoslovakia, and were aboard the S.S. Athenia, the first ship torpedoed by the Germans in the Second World War. They eventually arrived in Canada, and Dr. Altschul accepted a position in the Department of Anatomy at the University of Saskatchewan. Prior to coming to Canada he had to his credit 32 scientific papers, and in the following years he contributed another 71 papers dealing with various subjects, including pathology of the nervous system, skeletal muscle degeneration, cell division and in particular, arterial degeneration. His most notable contribution was in demonstrating the cholesterol-lowering effect of nicotinic acid. Dr. Altschul died on 4 November 1963.

Ambrosi Printers

  • Corporate body
  • 1929-2014

The company was formed in December 6, 1929, by Michael Ambrosi in Regina, Saskatchewan, after buying out Broche. In the early days, Michaels mothers did the bookkeeping and bindery work. At the age of thirty, Michael married a woman named Bernice, and together they had three children (a step-daughter and two sons). Michael worked full time, and it wasn’t until after his death that any of his children took an interest in the business, with son Phil Ambrosi taking over the work. The company prided itself on traditional craftsmanship and quality work. Ambrosi Printer’s expertise lay in letterpress printing which involved the casting of type using hot metal on a Ludlow Typograph machine. All of the equipment was entirely mechanical and had no electronic controls at all. For years, Ambrosi Printers not only printed directly for customers, but also cast and sold a very wide variety of hot metal type set on a Ludlow machine to other printers all across North America.
The company was one of the last Printers around that cast type using the Ludlow Typograph system and at one time had well over 1200 fonts for customers to choose from. Type was set using three Ludlow machines while printing was one using the shop’s four Heidelbergs.
Primarily, the company printed or imprinted the following items or provided: Foreign Language Business Cards & Stationery; General Business & Professional Stationery; All Kind of Die Cutting – Memoriam Cards -Prayer Cards; Poetry Cards – Mini Jigsaw Puzzles – Serviettes; Crash printing (front & back) – Grain Bags – Paper Bags; Legal Seals – Notion Bags – Notorial Seals – Rubber Stamps; Photo Mounts – Envelopes from Drug to X-Ray; Place Cards for Banquets; All Kinds of Numbering with Figures to 6? high; Blockout & Re-Print; Imprint Folded Brochures – Imprint File Folders
Ambrosi Printers, the last remaining manual printer in the province, closed its doors in December 2014 after 85 years in business.

Anderson, George William

  • Person
  • 1898-1988

George William Anderson was born on August 2, 1898 to Saskatoon pioneers Barbara Hunter and Newton Anderson. He was raised on the family farm near Blackley and was active in the early days of the Saskatoon Exhibition, serving as Director in 1923. George attended the University of Saskatchewan, in agriculture. He died in Saskatoon on January 29, 1988.

Anthropologists Among US

  • Corporate body
  • 2006-2008

Anthropologists Among US was a student-led campaign organized by the Anthropologists Student Association. During the 2000s, Anthropology classes at the University of Saskatchewan were shifted between departments. Originally paired with Archaeology, Anthropology classes were joined with the Department of Religious Studies in 2002 creating the Department of Religious Studies & Anthropology in an attempt to ensure the long-term stability of both programs. Despite this change, several tenured Anthropology faculty retired or left and were not replaced. In the fall of 2006, the situation reached a head when a number of Anthropology courses were cancelled because there was only one tenured Anthropology Professor left at the University. The Anthropologists Student Association decided to mount a publicity campaign in an attempt to secure the future of the program. In 2008, Anthropology was moved back with Archaeology, again forming the Department of Archaeology and Anthropology.

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