Showing 17 results

Names
Tuberculosis√

Barnett, George D. (Dr.)

  • Person
  • 1915-1982

George Barnett was born in Saskatoon in 1915. He entered medical school at the University of Manitoba in 1938. He spent a year out of university while being treated for pleurisy at the Fort San Sanatorium, but recovered and graduated in 1944. After graduation he served in the armed forces. In 1946, Dr. Ferguson obtained Dr. Barnett's early release from the armed forces (RCAMC) and he joined SATL as a medical doctor. In 1957 Dr. Barnett was appointed as Dr. Orr's assistant, and succeeded him as General Superintendent on December 15th, 1957. He retired in 1982. He received a Commemorative Medal for the 125th Anniversary of the Confederation of Canada, presented by the Governor General.

Beauval Indian Residential School

  • Corporate body
  • 1860-1995

Beauval (Lac La Plonge) Indian Residential School (1860 – 1995) was initially located in Île-à-la-Crosse, in what became Treaty 10 land. It became an official boarding school in 1897 with government funding for 12 children. In 1906, the Roman Catholic Mission that operated the school, moved the site at Lac la Plonge. The Mission ran the school until the federal government took control in 1969. The government worked in cooperation with the Board of Directors (comprised of the Chiefs of the Indian Bands in the Meadow Lake District) until the mid-70s, when the government transferred control of the residences to a First Nations parent group in response to their proposals. The school land became part of the La Plonge Indian Reserve in 1979. The Meadow Lake Tribal Council ran the school as the Beauval Indian Education Centre (an amalgamation of La Plonge High School and the Beauval Student Residence) from 1985 to 1995. The school buildings were demolished by former students in 1995.

Boughton, Henry C. (Dr.)

  • Person
  • 1917 - 1959

Medical Doctor, Fort San Sanatorium August 1, 1917 - 1925
Orchestra Director, Fort San Orchestra, 1917 - 1925
Medical Superintendent, Saskatoon Sanatorium, April 15, 1925 - 1959

Ferguson, Robert G. (Dr.)

  • Person
  • 1883-1964

Dr. Ferguson graduated from the Manitoba Medical School in 1916. Dr. Ferguson was appointed Medical Superintendent of the Fort San Sanatorium in 1917 and retired from the League in 1948. During this time he resided at Fort San with his wife Helen and their 7 children.

Fort Qu'Appelle Indian [Indigenous] Hospital

  • Corporate body
  • 1936-1996

The Fort Qu'Appelle Indian [Indigenous] Hospital was operated by the Department of Indian Affairs from 1936-1996. In 1996, ownership transferred to the Touchwood File Hills Qu'Appelle Tribal Council who operated it until 2004, when it was replaced by the All Nations' Healing Hospital. In 2014, the Fort Qu'Appelle Indian [Indigenous] Hospital building was demolished.

Fort San

  • Corporate body
  • 1917-1971

Kirkby, Robert W. (Dr.)

  • Person
  • 1919-1961

Dr. Robert W. Kirkby was a veteran of World War 1, who later worked as a Medical Doctor at the Fort San Sanatorium from August 1, 1919 and Medical Superintendent of the Prince Albert Sanatorium from its opening in 1930 to closing in 1961.

Lebret (Qu’Appelle) Indian Industrial Residential School

  • Corporate body
  • 1884-1998

The Lebret (Qu’Appelle, St. Paul’s, Whitecalf) Industrial School, (1884 – 1998) , operated by the Roman Catholic Church (Missionary Oblates of Mary Immaculate and the Grey Nuns) from 1884 until 1973, was one of the first three industrial schools that opened following the recommendations of the Davin Report, and was fully funded by the government. Lebret school has a long history as one of the first industrial schools to open and the last to close.

Orr, John H. (Dr.)

  • Person
  • 1926-1957

Dr. Orr, a former tuberculosis patient from Manitoba, joined the medical staff of the League in 1926. In 1948, Dr. Ferguson retired, and Dr. Orr succeeded him as General Superintendent and Director of Medical Services. He retired in 1957, succeeded by Dr. Barnett.

Saskatchewan Anti-Tuberculosis League

  • SCN00293
  • Corporate body
  • 1911-Present

The "Great White Plague" was the name used to describe tuberculosis. To fight the highly contagious disease the Saskatchewan Anti-Tuberculosis League was formed in 1911. Under its auspices Fort Qu'Appelle Sanatorium, was opened in 1917 to provide rest and fresh air. But the cure was long and tedious; few could afford to remain until they were healed. So in 1929, through the League's urging, Saskatchewan was the first province to make the care and treatment of tuberculosis free of charge.

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